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Long story short: Live in an apartment building, top floor. Balcony overrun with pigeons. Literally a quarter inch of bird feces covering the floor.

I bought a bird net and want to hang it up. Unfortunately, I am not sure how I can attach it to the ceiling of the balcony.

Cross section looks like this:

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The gap is where I want to put the net, with the hooks of some sort attached to the ceiling. My initial idea was to use eyelet screws; however, I've tried the following to no avail:

  • Drill(hammer drill) with masonry and metal drill bits of various sizes. Can't even make a dent.
  • Hammer in nail (RIP nail)
  • Tape (Used double-sided, cause that was the strongest I had. Still peeled off)

My next attempt might be to buy regular adhesive hooks (from a dollar store) and then use cement glue or sorts to try and keep them on the ceiling. If anyone has any advice on what I can do to attach the net to the ceiling (that doesn't require a big investment), please let me know.

Thank you

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Sounds like concrete?

A standard impact hammer drill will generally struggle and definitely not with HSS drill bits.

You would need a rotary hammer drill with SDS masonry bit.

Then have various fastener options.

Nails would be extremely difficult, you need masonry nails, but masonry nails from a nail gun can work easily into concrete.

If not concrete one of the only other things as tough is compressed cement sheeting.

Photo of the surface might help.

Also double sided tape does not work well on certain surfaces but quality is also important. Something like 3M VHB is insanely strong.

  • You are absolutely right! Mounting gorilla tape combined with dollar store plastic hooks is more than enough to get the job done! The previous time I used double sided tape just didn't work on the surface and wasn't meant for exterior use. – Metal Wing Aug 13 '16 at 20:54
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If buying/renting a rotary hammer isn't that interesting, you could get 3 sticks of 2x4. Roll the netting in the one that's as wide as your balcony, and then put a stick at each end to jam it in place. If your cut isn't perfect for a tight-tight friction fit, then use wood shims to make it tight. (So, shims under the post, and shims jamming the top beam in place.) If you feel you need to secure it more, put an L-bracket at the inside of each corner.

(Additional benefit: when you move, nobody will be yelling at you about the holes you drilled...)

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