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My basement is unfinished and has a French drain. The bare cement floor is dusty and it tracks footprints all over my hardwood floors. I want to stop the dust from forming.

I have tried to find this dust proofer at Home Depot but no luck. They don't carry it. Neither does Lowes.

http://www.rustoleum.com/product-catalog/industrial-brands/concrete-saver/water-based-floor-coatings/5500-system-acrylic-dustproofer-floor-sealer

They suggested I use a water proof sealer. This seems strange because my floors don't seem wet or moist. Doing some research, some sites suggest a concrete sealer like this one from Behr.

http://m.behr.com/h5/mobile/en_US/product_details?page_url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.behr.com%2Fconsumer%2Fproducts%2Ffloor-coatings-sealers-and-prep%2Fbehr-premium-wet-look-sealer-985

I'm a new home owner and this all new and confusing to me. Do I need to wet proof? A sealer? Or do I need to special order a dust proofer?

I plan to sweep, shop vac, and soap and water wash prior to application. Anything else I need to do?

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I would recommend using ordinary concrete floor paint, NON-glossy, water-based. One common brand of that is the same brand as a "waterproofer" but the paint and the waterproofer are very different products (the waterproofer is a very thick glop that covers a very small area per gallon.)

Non-glossy means it's not slippery without having to add anything to make it non-slip. Waterbased means it's also not horribly stinky and it's easy to clean your brushes/rollers. It's also easy to recoat if the surface is ever stained or damaged.

Both of the products you have linked will leave you with a gray concrete color (since they are clear) and a surface that is slippery.

My personal preference is white, since it makes the area MUCH brighter by reflecting light. Gray and "terra-cotta red" seem to be more common choices for floors, but I find the white floor very nice (mind, I don't freak out about trying to keep it perfect.)

If you are "soap and water washing" before paint, rinse, rinse some more, and rinse again - then dry throughly before painting. Soap residue is not good for paint.

  • Thanks for the input! If I were to use paint, should I worry about mold? Will the paint flake up easily? – duyn9uyen Aug 1 '16 at 14:15
  • Also, do I have to use any primer or top coat? – duyn9uyen Aug 1 '16 at 14:25
  • Would depend on the paint (for the stuff I linked to, which I have used, just the paint (no primer, no topcoat) is fine, though two coats tends to look better, on average.) Paint neither makes mold happen nor prevents it. Flaking depends almost entirely on good surface preparation - I've had no flaking in general, but a few places that have had severe mechanical abuse (heavy steel things dragged over concrete) have scratched through - easily painted over again. – Ecnerwal Aug 1 '16 at 14:59
  • If I decide to lay tile down in the future, would the products I linked to, have a problem? I know that floor paint would have to be scraped off. – duyn9uyen Aug 1 '16 at 23:39
  • Most likely the same - they are pretty much clear paint. If you are thinking about tiling, just go ahead and tile. – Ecnerwal Aug 2 '16 at 0:17
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I had this problem; the problem often comes from incorrectly prepared cement that was (I think) too wet, and that had too much migration of the fines to the top surface.

Sweeping and mopping actually make the problem worse, as they cause the cement fines to stop adhering to the rest of the floor.

A better solution is to grind the top off, and to top it with a product that physically binds to the now-roughened floor.

My solution was to put a self-leveling epoxy floor down. This was time consuming and moderately expensive, but completely eliminated the dust issue. Unlike floor paint, it doesn't chip or scuff, and it is easy to mop.

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You need to clean and etch the floor, or profile if there are any glues or residue stuck to the floor. Then seal with a clear or colored water based polyurethane sealer . The home Depot lowes stuff is ok but really does not last. Use a high quality sealer such as SureCrete Products. Best thing is to get a contractor involved if you want it to last. I do this for a living.

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