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  1. Is it safe to take a flexible natural gas hose such as the one pictured and pass it under a patio's wooden stairs to reach a BBQ? Can it simply lie on the concrete under the patio?

natural gas hose

  1. Can you ever leave a hose such as the one pictured pressurized overnight, or must you always turn off the incoming gas, rather than simply turning off at the BBQ?

  2. Suppose you're hardy and intend to broil something once in a while in freezing temperatures, can such a hose be left outside over winter?

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    My first question would be, "Is this hose rated for outdoor use?" – ArchonOSX Jul 12 '16 at 9:12
  • One question per post, please. – Carl Witthoft Jul 12 '16 at 14:57
  • Fundamental safety rule: always shut off power supply (gas, gasoline, electric) at the source when not in use. Whether or not a hose should hold pressure is irrelevant when the downside is a major house fire. – Carl Witthoft Jul 12 '16 at 15:00
  • @CarlWitthoft You're right. I wasn't too sure where to splice the questions, while still keeping related issues on the same page. I've now sliced one part off (the part concerning regulators and pressure). – Calaf Jul 12 '16 at 18:01
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Before we get in to the answers to your specific questions, you first need to read the instructions that come with the hose and whatever you hook it up to. For example, the hose may not be rated for continuous outdoor UV exposure. And your grill probably says to turn off the gas at the source; the burner valves are not designed to hold up against supply pressure indefinitely.

Is it safe to take a flexible natural gas hose such as the one pictured and pass it under a patio's wooden stairs to reach a BBQ? Can it simply lie on the concrete under the patio?

  1. That should be fine. Just make sure it's not easily stepped on, or rubbing against an edge. And don't let water freeze on it.

Can you ever leave a hose such as the one pictured pressurized overnight, or must you always turn off the incoming gas, rather than simply turning off at the BBQ?

  1. No. You need to turn the hose off when it's not in use. If this were connected to a cylinder it would be less of an issue since the cylinder has a fixed volume of gas. But since this is hooked up to a gas supply line, it could be days or weeks before a leak is noticed, potentially creating a huge pocket of trapped gas.

can such a hose be left outside over winter?

  1. Check the ratings on the hose.
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I have a multi outlet tank that I use camping hoses look like yours. One goes to a lantern that runs all night one to a water heater and one to the stove. The instructions say to turn off when not in use but we never do. We have been in freezing temperatures with snow quite a few times the only problem is if the tank is low we have to switch to a full one until it warms up then we can finish off the low tank. I have been using this setup for over 20 years that's a lot of setups & take down's and we have never had any problem (2 of the hoses are 15' 1 is 3'). I would say if it is outside and not damaged by weed eaters or being pinched by the steps it should be Ok. I should add for Carl this setup normally my system is set up outside close to my creek during the summer months and has been for many years it has been outside for more than 10 years over the last 22 years I only take it down for going hunting and when the creek starts over running its banks.

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    "The plural of anecdote is not data" . – Carl Witthoft Jul 12 '16 at 14:58
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    @CarlWitthoft, I had to look that up, that was deep. I don't see how it pertains to Ed explaining his personal experiences on the OP's question. I know this is not the place to discuss such things but I can only guess how to apply it here. Just curious.... If I had the same experience, I would have shared it too. – Jack Jul 12 '16 at 16:49
  • @Jack The reason it's a bad answer is that people in general suffer "confirmation bias," which basically means that they tend towards the first answer they get, regardless of the actual value. So in this case, even if the median lifetime of a hose left outside is 5 years (for example), a posted 20-year anecdote will be highly misleading. – Carl Witthoft Jul 12 '16 at 18:40
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11 years constantly outside in Ohio w. all 4 seasons. Never turned off. Is protected from weedeaters and abrasion. Another anecdotal data point that you can leave it on for a decade and not worry.

Grill is now dead, I will replace the hose and natural gas conversion kit w. another new one.

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