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Like the title says. Is there any Code in North Carolina that states an electrical panel can Not be mounted in a locked room?

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If you own the building, and provide "continuous building management supervision". Then yes, the panel can be locked up. Otherwise, no. Tenants need to have access to their panels.

Well, technically... The door can be locked, but the tenants must have a key.

National Electrical Code 2014

Chapter 2 Wiring and Protection

Article 240 Overcurrent Protection

240.24 Location in or on Premises.

(B) Occupancy. Each occupant shall have ready access to all overcurrent devices protecting the conductors supplying that occupancy, unless otherwise permitted in 240.24(B)(1) and (B)(2).

(1) Service and Feeder Overcurrent Devices. Where electric service and electrical maintenance are provided by the building management and where these are under continuous building management supervision, the service overcurrent devices and feeder overcurrent devices supplying more than one occupancy shall be permitted to be accessible only to authorized management personnel in the following:

(1) Multiple-occupancy buildings

(2) Guest rooms or guest suites.

(2) Branch-Circuit Overcurrent Devices. Where electric service and electrical maintenance are provided by the building management and where these are under continuous building management supervision, the branch-circuit overcurrent devices supplying any guest rooms or guest suites without permanent provisions for cooking shall be permitted to be accessible only to authorized management personnel.

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  • What if it is a Vacation Rental home Cabin? We manage the property but there are going to be tenants in the home at at various times as it is a vacation rental. It is a single family home, can it be locked in a garage so that the guests do not have access to it? Jun 30, 2016 at 17:15
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    @PropertyManger101 No. Not unless the building is "under continuous building management supervision". If there's a problem where a breaker has to be switched off, or where a breaker trips. The "occupant" must be able to have access to the breakers. Unless there's some type of local amendment, the code is what it is.
    – Tester101
    Jun 30, 2016 at 17:20
  • Can anyone answer this for Quebec?
    – cachvico
    Jul 29, 2016 at 3:52

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