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I am about to create a frame for a mosquito net, and I have read in various places that the end of the logs of the frame should be cut diagonally, and the logs joined along this diagonal cut (see fig. 1), instead of just joining them along the edges (fig.2) I never found an explanation, why is the diagonal cut better. So my question is: what is the advantage of this diagonal cut? Is it just aesthetic or is it also more stable in some way?

Fig. 1.

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Fig. 2.

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  • Thanks for the answers guys. In the end, I'm keeping the 90 degree version, since I'm quite noob in this area :) – Attilio Jun 19 '16 at 11:29
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The 45 deg cut gives more surface area for glue if you glue and more strength , 90,s are easy and can be nailed or glued but any paralyx (not totally square) will show more and be weaker than a 45. I have done both in the past but 45's look professional and last longer. Just look at your door frames, sliding screen doors and you will find 45's not 90's

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    45's are also harder to get right. I've done lots of 43's and 47's in my day, and they don't look great. – Harper - Reinstate Monica Jun 18 '16 at 22:24
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The advantage is if your wood is in any sort of complex shape other than plain rectangular. If you join at 45, it automatically makes the shapes line up.

The classic example of that is picture framing.

Of course, it's harder than cutting square. Tests the quality of the saw setup, and your skill.

Why would you want a complex shape for a screen holder? Say, you want the installation to be aesthetically attractive, or you want to cover the rough ends of the screen with a firring piece.

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