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Today I was adjusting my sprinkler system heads and I had my spigot turned on with my hose and nozzle attached. Strangely, when two zones would turn. On the spigot would shoot water out until the sprinklers were. Fully charged and operating. Only two of the five zones would make the spigot leak. As far ask know this wasn't happening last summer. The main water. line leaving the house splits and one pipe leads to the backyard and this leaking spigot and the other leads to sprinkler system. Any clue what could be causing this to happen?

  • Need clarification: you say "I had my spigot tuned on". If that was the case, the spigot certainly would "shoot water out" as you describe. Also, it would be difficult to adjust the sprinkler heads with the spigot on. – Jimmy Fix-it Jun 2 '16 at 4:05
  • My spigot is on because my swamp cooler on the roof is attached to it, which obviously needs water constant water flow. The sprinkler system is not associated with this spigot because they have a dedicated line from my main line coming into the house. I thought it could be the anti-syphon acting up on the spigot, but the water does not come out of the top and instead comes out of the actual handle. So the water is not coming out of the spigot opening where you would attach a hose, or in my case my swamp cooler line. Does this clarify? – junta Jun 2 '16 at 4:22
  • I'm confused by what you mean. Do you mean the spigot is leaking from where it should not? – The Evil Greebo Jun 2 '16 at 15:03
  • Yeah, so water shoots out of the handle, not the actual spigot. Imagine if I unscrewed the handle and had the water on, that is what is happening. I haven't opened it up to check the washer yet. But it just seems really strange that this is happening when only 2 zones of my sprinkler system is coming on. – junta Jun 2 '16 at 15:15
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Sounds like an anti-siphon reaction to me, full water pressure in the hose going to your roof, and the house water pressure temporarily drops from the large demand from those two zones until the sprinklers are fully charged. You can try adding an anti-siphon or backflow prevention valve on the faucet to verify (they make valves that screw on between the faucet and hose). If the leaking stops or significantly reduces, then you know that's the cause.

As for why it's leaking out the stem, I'm not sure, but it's possible that's by design. The cap on top should be a vacuum breaker, allowing air in the lines after the water is shutoff and pressure drops.

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