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My water pressure in the house is 130psi. This is way too high and is causing my appliances to fail. I have a water pressure regulator but when I adjust it, all the way up or all the way down, the water pressure remains at 130 psi. I have tried to adjust it with the main valve from the city on as well as turning it off. Neither seems to have an effect. What am I doing wrong?

THese are the steps I am taking to adjust the water pressure regulator: http://homeguides.sfgate.com/adjust-psi-water-pressure-reducing-valve-75198.html

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    Are you opening a faucet to relieve the pressure in the system, after you make an adjustment? If there's 130 psi in a closed loop, adjusting the regulator won't change the pressure already in the closed loop. Adjust the regulator, open a faucet, check gauge, repeat. – Tester101 Apr 3 '16 at 22:12
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Sounds like the rubber diaphragm inside he pressure regulator has torn, or something is in the way.
To fix be sure you have: A pressure gauge 2 pipe wrenches able to open to about 1 1/2" Large channel locks could substitute for one above pipe wrench Water meter key Crescent wrench

And the parts. You need to find the metal tag on the regulator it will give you the model number and information about he valve.
You need to head to the local plumbing supply I'm not sure if you will be able to find the kit at a home inprovment wharehouse

You need a rebuild kit for a ####. Whatever model you have. They may ask the size of the regulator.

Once you have the kit. Shut the water off. If you have a gate style valve use the meter key at the meter instead.

Use the pipe wrenches to loosen the front packing (where the adjustment screw is ). Then break loose the two unions From there it's just a matter of replacing the diaphragm and spring. Then install. Don't forget to use plumbing silicone grease on the rubber parts and the gaskets in the unions

Put the gauge on the hose bib and slowly turn the water on not all the way just about 1/4 open. Check the pressure. Most regulators come set around 55psi this is recommended unless you have an RO system then I recommend upwards of 70 psi.

  • note: shut the water off upstream of the pressure regulator. – ratchet freak Apr 4 '16 at 9:35
  • I don't know what you mean by upstream. If you mean before the regulator. Then I say. If you don't know to shut the water off before the regulator. Stop now your going to have major difficulties. And if you mean after the regulator id say. What's the point. Either the water will drain or if everything is closed the vacuum will keep the pipes full. Just as long as no one opens anything to let the air in. Think like a can of soup. Doesn't flow till the 2nd hole I just coined a phrase! – Dustin H Apr 5 '16 at 4:29

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