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What is a good kind of glue to glue small pieces of drywall that are too big for mud patches but small enough that driving a screw through would crumble the drywall piece?

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Any common construction or project adhesive. That said, drywall nails are fairly thin for just that reason. If it's large enough that you're installing a patch, a nail won't destroy the patch.

And that said, it's often the easiest solution to simply enlarge the patch to something suitable for repair, say 6" x 6". Float some one-by lumber or plywood scraps for backing and be happy.

  • Or just anything that makes it stick long enough for the mud to set. – DMoore Apr 1 '16 at 20:51
  • it's often the easiest solution to simply enlarge the patch to something suitable for repair -- sometimes you can't do that because you're in a tight area to begin with, e.g. between a door and a corner – amphibient Apr 1 '16 at 21:08
  • as for the nails, i thought of it but i think when you get to the stage where you're driving the nail beneath the drywall surface, it can easily crumble there – amphibient Apr 1 '16 at 21:10
  • Yes, hence the word "often". Gypsum is soft enough that it's very possible to set nails to adequate depth without breaking the patch. I sometimes use the chin of my hammer's face for more precision. – isherwood Apr 1 '16 at 21:14
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Run the screw in reverse until it drills a hole for you in the drywall. Then sink it carefully.

Down to the size of about 1.5" strips you can still use screws with this method. For anything smaller I'm partial to construction adhesives that act like liquid nails.

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