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The novelty of seeing a pair of ducks descend on my swimming pool is wearing out. I'm not sure how they will leave the place, but after every two-hour visit, the surface of the water ceases to be pristine, and I know from past experience that hosting pigeons is a very bad recipe (worse, I fed them). They multiply and take over the place, make it filthy, and are very hard to shoo away once settled.

ducks

At this time the pool is still covered. The two ducks swim in the layer of water above the cover. Possibly once opened the problem will be solved on its own because, however minimal the chlorine I use, they may dislike it. So far I simply clap and that scares them to leave for a while.

What is an effective repellent for ducks? I thought about:

  1. A bucket of concentrated chlorine,
  2. Add some chlorine in the very shallow, still-closed, pool (with a risk of discoloring the cover),
  3. A motion sensor that triggers some crackling sound (rather tedious to put together for what I hope would be a temporary device + neighbors will not be amused if it's triggered in the middle of the night).

Can you share your experience about a (perfectly humane) way to nudge the ducks to move over to the plentiful ponds and creeks nearby?

  • 1
    get a pet that hunts them. – ratchet freak Mar 22 '16 at 14:29
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    Ducks don't like alligators, maybe an alligator pool float? – Tester101 Mar 22 '16 at 14:29
  • I'd embrace. Build a roost and start harvesting duck eggs! – DA01 Mar 22 '16 at 16:45
  • @DA01 Nah.. not with the junk people feed the ducks with by the creeks! – Calaf Mar 22 '16 at 17:16
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    If you can't find an alligator pool float, just go with an alligator? @Tester101 ... – FreeMan Mar 22 '16 at 17:35
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I had bird problems in my pool until I put this motion activated sprinkler. I am not sure if it will work with ducks but the geese hate it and stay out of the pool.

0

Pool Solar Covers or Blankets or lots of bubble-wrap are usually quite effective & heat the pool (if desired) & can keep leaves & debris out & from sinking. But, they can drown people who aren't familiar with them or don't notice they're there. A simple color choice or spray painting "remove this cover" can avoid accidents & should be done by all manufacturers regardless of colors or designs.

  • The OP already has a cover. – DA01 Mar 22 '16 at 16:44
  • Yeah, that's a heavy permanent pool closing cover, could be 150lbs. Very different. The Solar Covers weigh 25lbs max. & are meant to just float on the water, suctioning to the water's surface tension. – Iggy Mar 22 '16 at 16:53
  • I have both, though my impression was that the bubble-wrap cover is so fragile I should not keep it floating over winter. I kept it wrapped with tarp. Now Spring is close enough that I could float the bubble wrap before opening the pool. Aside from the potential damage from the remaining snow storm in early April, I'm also concerned that the heat accumulating between the two covers would encourage the various micro-organism to start growing (they seem not to like multiplying in the rain water accumulating on top of the heavy cover over winter). – Calaf Mar 22 '16 at 17:08
  • Oh no, you don't want to use both covers. Just one or the other for their specific purpose is best. Ice could sink or pop the bubble wrap, but more importantly your closing cover won't be able to drain, if it's a filtering mesh. Definitely store & use them separately in any case. – Iggy Mar 22 '16 at 17:19

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