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I have been working through the wiring in my house to add in gfci's in the appropriate locations and update outlets and switches. I am familiar with usual three-way and four-way light set-ups and have had no trouble updating with most of the three-way and four-way wiring configurations. The exception is an overhead-fluorescent light in my kitchen with four flourescent bulbs.

There are three switches for this one light, two of which are in the same box. Two of the switches are three-way switches and the one sharing the box is only a two-way switch. If the two-way is flipped off, flipping either of the three-way switches turns the light on (but only 2 of 4 fluorescent lights are turned on). If the two-way is flipped on, 2 of the 4 lights are automatically on, and flipping either of the two switches turns the other two on.

I have not quite figured out the wiring connections between the three light switches, but is it possible that two of the four fluorescent lights are hooked up to the three way switches and the other two lights are only hooked up to the single two-way switch? If so, is this set-up all up to code? If not, any idea as to what is going on here?

Extra important info: There is a single wire going from the three way switch to the two-way switch and three wires hooked up to the two-way switch (one in back slot and two on side wire terminals).

Thanks ahead of time for any help!

  • The proper term is "single pole" rather than "two-way". – Jimmy Fix-it Mar 21 '16 at 1:53
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Real simple. 2 of the fluorescent lights are on the 3-way switches.

Separate from that, 2 of the fluorescent lights are on the 2-way switch.

The reason is to give a "low-high" setting.

The wire going from the 3-way switch to the 2-way switch is always-hot supply power. The other 3-way switch is the "remote".

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Two of your lights are on a normal three-way circuit.

The other two are on the two way switch.

I can't think of any reason this wouldn't be code, but I'm not in the US.

Extra important info: There is a single wire going from the three way switch to the two-way switch and three wires hooked up to the two-way switch (one in back slot and two on side wire terminals).

The wire is probably the always-on feed. The three wires are likely feed in, feed out (to the other switch), and control out (to the light). I'm not sure on whether this is OK in the US.

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