4

Most of our doors have a mechanism to automatically close them.

The mechanism looks to be a chain that is connected to a spring which pulls the door shut. Like so:

              Door closing tensioner

What can I do to prevent the slamming noise without stopping the door from closing itself.

  • What you describe does not sound like anything I have seen in the way of a mechanical closer. A picture would really be useful here. – Jack Oct 31 '15 at 16:40
  • It just looks like a piece of bicycle between the frame. It is located in the same side that the hinges are on. – Terry Oct 31 '15 at 16:47
  • ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31l5wCQFQjL._SY400_.jpg here is an example – Terry Oct 31 '15 at 17:41
6

Beware of UK fire codes before replacing that closer -- which you probably don't need to do.

  • Almost all of the closers of that type are adjustable, see below.
  • Rubber door bumpers are very cheap, can help a lot (but aren't as good as a well-adjusted, top-line, hydraulic closer), and come in a variety of sizes and styles. Here's some at Amazon that should work well.

Most of those chain tensioners are adjustable. Turn the anchor plate widdershins to lower the tension. Just use CAUTION as the chain exerts considerable force. See below.

Adjust door tensioner

General procedure (defer to manufacturer's instructions if possible):

  1. Open the door fully and block it in place.
  2. Clip or pin the chain to keep it from retracting. All closers come with a clip for this purpose, but sometimes you can get a small nail though the chain. Vicegrips might work in a pinch. USE CAUTION.
  3. Move the door slightly towards closed; the chain should go slack.
  4. Unscrew the anchor plate from the door. If it looks like the chain will retract, STOP!
  5. Turn the anchor plate counter-clockwise to decrease the tension. One half-turn at a time.
  6. Refasten the anchor plate and unpin the chain.
  7. Make sure the door closes as required by your local regulations.
  8. Repeat as necessary.
  9. If the anchor plate should become fully retracted while it is loose, it can be pulled back out using a claw hammer.
  • Ah Haven't seen that dsign. Much better than the simple springs we sometimws get here. – keshlam Nov 1 '15 at 0:29
  • From what i can see it matches the design you posted. I cannot tell if the internal portion is the same, but i assume it is. – Terry Nov 1 '15 at 1:58
  • Excellent. Let us know how it turns out. – Brock Adams Nov 1 '15 at 2:31
5

The proper answer would be to replace that mechanism with a hydraulic closer which has seperate adjustments for closing speed and latching speed (as most do).

If you can't do that, padding the frame (perhaps with medium-density foam weatherstripping) would be worth trying.

(Suggesting brands is out of scope for Stack Exchange. Many home contractors or locksmiths could tell you what's availavle on that side of the puddle and which ones they like,)

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