3

I'm wiring a 240V/60A hot tub which requires 3 conductors; one of these conductors is ground. No neutral is run to the tub. That said, I have a red, black, and green running to the hot tub from the spa disconnect panel.

From the main service panel, I'm trying to confirm whether or not I need to run a neutral to the spa disconnect panel. Which configurations are valid / invalid below, and are there other configurations I should consider? I have a hunch only configuration #3 is correct with respect to the ones below, but please confirm.

Notes on diagrams:

  1. There is a load neutral terminal on the GFCI (colored in purple in the pictures below). Since the hot tub does not require neutral, I believe this should not be wired in any case.
  2. Only the neutral wire differs between configurations. The black, red, and green positions are consistent.

Configuration #1

No neutral from the main service panel to the spa disconnect panel. Wire the pig-tail neutral from the GFCI into the neutral bar.

enter image description here


Configuration #2

No neutral from the main service panel to the spa disconnect panel. Wire the pig-tail neutral from the GFCI into the ground bar.

enter image description here


Configuration #3

Run neutral from the main service panel to the spa disconnect panel and terminate it at the neutral bar. Wire the pig-tail neutral from the GFCI into the neutral bar as well.

enter image description here

2

The first configuration seems correct. The second is definitely wrong, and the third may just be a waste of wire.

If the spa has only 240 volt loads, then a load side grounded (neutral) conductor is not required. Which means you won't have to connect the grounded (neutral) pigtail from the GFCI breaker.

If you really wanted to, you could should install a grounded (neutral) as in the third configuration. This might be worth doing, if you might add 120 volt loads in the future.

Check the manufacturer's installation instructions for both the spa pack, and the breaker to be sure. But you should just be able to cap the pigtail with a twist-on wire connector.


After further review

According to Schneider Electric's faq, the line neutral must be connected. So configuration 3 is the only way to go.

On 2P 15A to 50A the GFI breaker will work with or without a load neutral wire. However, if there is no load neutral wire the breaker neutral (white curly wire) must still be connected to the panel neutral.

On 2P 60A and all 3P (QO only) there is no load neutral wire connection on the breaker. Again the breaker neutral (white curly wire) must be connected to the panel neutral.

  • The installation instructions say, "Connect the panel neutral 'pig-tail' wire to a load center or panel neutral bar." However, I'm not sure if this statement assumes a neutral wire to the load terminal. It does not specify. I'm not sure what a "load center" is in this context. – Scott Lin Oct 4 '15 at 23:05
  • And as I read more online, will the "test" button of the GFCI function without configuration #3? I get the feeling the GFCI mechanism may work, but the test button will not. Not sure if you or anyone else can confirm. – Scott Lin Oct 4 '15 at 23:20
  • "load center" is a panelboard and enclosure, just another term for what you're calling a "panel". – Tester101 Oct 4 '15 at 23:33
  • 1
    @kurifodo You are correct, the line side neutral must be connected. – Tester101 Oct 5 '15 at 0:15
  • 3
    A LINE side neutral connection is ALWAYS required for a GFI breaker. #3 is your only choice. – Speedy Petey Oct 5 '15 at 2:28

protected by Community Mar 24 '17 at 1:30

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