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I'm attempting to wire a RV for hooking up to 50 Amp Service.

Using a AC Diconnect (60-Amp 240-Volt 240-Watt Fused )connected to a

125 Amp (PowerMark Gold 125-Amp 4-Space 8-Circuit Indoor Main Lug Circuit Breaker Panel)

My concern is that the AC Disconnect does not have a Lug for Neutral.

Would it be okay to run the Nuetral straight from the RV Plug to the 125 Amp Panel ?

I cant afford an electrician at the moment and have been taking advice from Home Depot employees so I would greatly appreciate some oversight

This is what I was told to do by HD QUESTION

2 Answers 2

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That is perfectly fine.

The neutral does not have to terminate in the disconnect box, but of course the equipment ground does.

Just so you know, as long as you are coming from a 50A breaker in the breaker panel you do not need a fused disconnect. Actually, what is feeding that ML panel? I cannot see a feeder.

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    The disconnect is required, because it looks like there's 8 handles in the panel.
    – Tester101
    Sep 23, 2015 at 23:46
  • Also, I believe nothing is currently feeding the panel, since the feed will come from the disconnect.
    – Tester101
    Sep 23, 2015 at 23:47
  • I have the disconnect as my 'Main Shutoff '. The feed is coming from a 50 Amp Receptacle Like this one homedepot.com/catalog/productImages/1000/84/… Im using 6 Gauge to wire it, was having concerns about the neutral since I need 240 and 120
    – Jimmy
    Sep 23, 2015 at 23:56
  • OH!! Ok, sorry, I was looking at it backwards. That panel is in the RV, that is not the source panel. I thought you were wiring an RV receptacle. Either way, what you propose is fine. And yes, since it is a ML panel with more than 6 spaces you do need some form of service disconnect. Sep 24, 2015 at 1:06
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The wiring is fine, and nothing wrong with. Neutral is meant for the current to return so as long as the ungrounded conductors (red and black) are 'interruptible' by the disconnect, it looks good. The disconnect however, should be 'service rated' which given that its fusible, it probably is.

Also, just want to point out that on the diagram, it states 120V on the ungrounded conductors (red and black). But in an AC system, you would only see one ungrounded conductor for 120V, and a neutral. However, above you state its 240V. What this seems like to me is a 240/120V, single phase, 3 wire system. Which would mean that the black and red conductors are actually 240V, and only the neutral is 120V. Just a heads up.

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    It actually says "120 Volts each" i.e. normal USA/Canada center tapped service, 120V hot to neutral, 240V hot to hot. And most AC systems with a service disconnect are 240V. The 120V ones usually have a line cord.
    – Ecnerwal
    May 11, 2022 at 2:15
  • @Ecnerwal This answer is obviously using “AC” in the “alternating current” sense, not “air conditioner”.
    – nobody
    May 11, 2022 at 20:27
  • @Ecnerwal - As user ‘nobody’ pointed out, it appears you only briefly glanced at the diagram and question. The picture clearly shows a load center and OP is asking about a ‘service’ disconnect hence an air conditioner would not make sense within this context. Hence the ‘120V each’ statement remains incorrect and each line should have been labeled as ‘240V each’. May 12, 2022 at 4:55
  • A 60 Amp AC disconnect is a standard A/C part - you can use them to disconnect the AC to something that's not an A/C, but it doesn't change what it is when you go shopping for one. As for "240V each" that's just plain ignorance of how the US/Canada power distribution system works, unless you're looking at 480V, which we are not, given the NEMA 14-50 plug.
    – Ecnerwal
    May 12, 2022 at 11:54
  • @Ecnerwal - "A 60 Amp AC disconnect is a standard A/C part - you can use them to disconnect the AC to something that's not an A/C, but it doesn't change what it is when you go shopping for one." Not sure what the purpose of mentioning this. But ok. "As for "240V each" that's just plain ignorance of how the US/Canada power distribution system works" Unless you are measuring one from one of the hots to a neutral, if you measure from line to line, your voltage will be 240V. No ignorance. May 13, 2022 at 16:36

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