0

I just recently replaced the gutters on the entire property and also installed a mesh over them to keep debris out of the gutters. However, I noticed that it was still overflowing during a recent thunderstorm. Upon closer inspection, it appears that some tree debris from the roof is running through the roof troughs and collecting in the gutter corners (mitres) thereby impeding the flow of water.

Is there an effective way to prevent this run-in from the roof on to the gutter, stopping short of just cutting off the trees on the property?

I have included pictures with the problem areas highlighted. Again, these gutters are less than 3 weeks old and are 6 inches wide.

GutterMiterClog

  • 1
    That is also an inherently problematic roof, from a guttering viewpoint. All the water from both of those roof planes comes out that valley and hits the corner. The only part of the gutter that's working (to catch water from the roof) is the part in the red square - the rest has no roof plane draining into it. Won't take much rain to overwhelm it even if it's spotlessly clean. I suspect your leaves are sitting on top of the mesh, though eventually they do work through if they don't fall off. – Ecnerwal May 20 '15 at 19:41
  • I'm thinking about a splashguard to at least inhibit the water overflow, but that, too, is delaying the inevitable. The only problem with that is the unsightliness. Just wanted to check in since I'm guessing this is common to any house with gables – rs79 May 21 '15 at 13:20
  • 1
    Best bet would be to relocate the downspout so it's right at this corner, and any other corners configured this way. Let the water just leave, rather than have to turn corners and flow somewhere else to find an exit. – Ecnerwal May 21 '15 at 18:19
1

It is generally advisable to not have tree branches making contact with your house, so regardless you might want to consider trimming the branches back. Removing the tree entirely is probably overkill but is an option. Make sure to check with your local jurisdiction to see if a permit is required.

Alternatively, you're just going to need to clean them out regularly, especially in the spring and fall.

Even with gutter guards, debris will still find its way into the gutters, albeit it at a slower rate.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.