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I searched for my question but could not find the answers. I had the inspector out for my rough in on electrical inspection. He said I did a very nice job but I need to make all my grounds at all my boxes. (Receptacles, Lights, etc.)

My question is how do I properly make my grounds at all boxes. Example. I have my feed wire coming into my receptacle box and then my 12-2 wire continues out of the box and onto the next. Do I have to install the receptacle and piggy back a wire from both grounds to the receptacle or is there a proper way to do this?

  • run a ground from the main panel to each box parallel to the each of the existing wires. If the 12-2 has a ground wire (yellow jacket or bare copper) use that. – ratchet freak Apr 27 '15 at 12:42
  • Are you using metal boxes? Does the 12-2 cable you're using include a grounding conductor? – Tester101 Apr 27 '15 at 13:01
  • Hi Tester101, Yes forgot to mention they are plastic boxes and my 12-2 wire does include the bare ground wire. – Duane Apr 27 '15 at 14:37
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There's a many different ways to do it, and how it's done depends on personal preference.

Example Methods

Long tail

In this variation, the Electrician will leave one of the grounding conductors long. He'll install a ground screw in the threaded hole in the back of the box, and loop the long conductor around the screw around the middle of the conductor. Then he'll collect all the grounding conductors in the box, and twist them together with the remainder of the long grounding conductor. Once twisted, he'll use either a crimp or twist-on wire connector to "permanently" connect the conductors together.

Pigtail

Another option is to gather all the grounding conductors together, and twist them together with an extra bit of grounding conductor. Again using a crimp or twist-on wire connector to "permanently" connect the conductors together. Then connect one end of the extra bit of conductor to the box using a grounding screw, or a grounding clip.

Greenie®

More recently, guys have been using Greenies from Ideal industries. They're basically a twist-on wire connector with a hole in the top. This method is similar to the long tail method, except that the long tail feeds through the Greenie, and the remaining grounding conductors are connected to the long tail using the Greenie as a twist-on wire connector. The bit of wire protruding from the end of the Greenie is then wrapped around the ground screw, or attached to the box using a ground clamp

Materials

Twist-on wire connectors

Twist-on wire connectors

Crimp Connectors

Crimp Connectors

Ground Screw

Ground Screw

Ground Clip

Ground Clip

Greenie® Grounding Connector

Greenie® Grounding Connector

  • Thank you very much. That pretty much sums it up for me. I may just go the easy route and use the Greenie as long as they dont break the bank. Any suggestions on my light boxes also, or are they connected the same way. Example, I have my main feed coming in - 12-2 w/ ground and then I feed out of my plastic box to the light. Thank you. – Duane Apr 27 '15 at 14:38
  • If it's a plastic box, you don't have to ground the box. Just the devices in the box. – Tester101 Apr 27 '15 at 15:23

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