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When I connect my GFCI receptacle on one circuit that shares the neutral wire with another circuit, it immediately faults out. If I remove the second circuit from the neutral there is no problem.

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  • How are you connecting the GFCI? If the shared neutral is on the LOAD side of the GFCI, then it will surely trip. If the shared neutral is on the LINE side, it shouldn't be a problem if it's wired properly.
    – Tester101
    Commented Feb 26, 2015 at 12:44
  • It is on the Load Side. Are you saying that if I connect the other circuit's neutral to the line side that it should then work? The other circuit's Hot/Black simply passes through this receptacle box.
    – Top Cat
    Commented Feb 26, 2015 at 12:56
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    This diagram from this answer should help you. The neutral coming into this box should split, where one side connects to the LINE side of the GFCI and the other to the neutral of the other circuit.
    – Tester101
    Commented Feb 26, 2015 at 13:12
  • If the second circuit's neutral "joins" the GFCI circuit down the line in a box containing a second outlet on the GFCI circuit, will I have to pull another neutral wire for the second circuit into the GFCI box and join the neutrals there?
    – Top Cat
    Commented Feb 26, 2015 at 13:23
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    I think you need to look in to why there's a shared neutral. It sounds like maybe something is wired incorrectly, or it's a bootleg installation. A shared neutral should only exist on a multi-wire branch circuit.
    – Tester101
    Commented Feb 26, 2015 at 13:41

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