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I want to find some colored/transparent plastic sheeting that has stable mechanical properties at 100 degrees Celsius, 200 Fahrenheit.

Edit- Sorry i forgot to say the project: It's for an electically insulated prototype drilled and machined box for lithium batteries, with various drill places for the batteries and some places for various screw fixtures. i can't allow the plastic to case to warp at all and i have to foresee a possible scenario where something could be 70 degrees and under tension of springs and so on.

Something very tough, same as plexiglass or pvc sheet.

I wish to have it in a sheet format for example 1/4 inch, 7.5mm

Someone told me that there are some electronics boards and fiberglass epoxies that are stable until 150 degrees C at least...

i dont know anything about plastic, what sheets can i find of that kind? melamine would be ok, except i don't think i'll find melamine sheets round here very easily.

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    What's it for? Why not use actual glass? Why plastic? If you go on craigslist and look under free you'll find people getting rid of kitchen ovens - the glass in the door is heat-resistent to very high temps.
    – ssaltman
    Feb 13 '15 at 13:57
  • Yeah, just use glass. If it needs to be tough, use tempered and/or laminated safety glass.
    – iLikeDirt
    Feb 13 '15 at 16:01
  • Sorry i forgot to say the project: It's for an electically insulated prototype drilled and machined box for lithium batteries, with various drill places for the batteries and some places for various screw fixtures. Feb 13 '15 at 16:57
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Plastics that are thermally stable at this range would be VERY exotic to the average person just going to a hardware store or ordering online (without a very large budget). Plastics by nature tend to be something that can be injection molded, vacuum molded or similar , that is to say easily deform-able/mold-able with heat, which is not what you're looking for.

At that temperature range, unless you're looking into fast temperature swings, I would suggest a glass or ceramic material. Even then, Pyrex is an incredible material used in lighthouse lenses where they must deal with the intense heat of the light source, and be durable in often cold/wet areas. Even your average pyrex baking pan carries these properties. I seem to remember my mother even having a stove-top pan made from this material.

If you could elaborate on your intentions/projects, I'm sure we could make some more specific suggestions.

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I found a chart with precise measurements of everything's strength vs temperature, PE is machineable and fairly high temps, PCcarbonate is high around 150'C... epoxy laminates like FR4 standard pcb board are made of 7 layers of fiberglass epoxy, same with carbon fiber...

the record is Peek poly ether ether ketone, i.e. peek CA30 which has a useage up to 1000 and is like a solid block of waxy teflon, it's about as hard as carbon fibre laminate. one thing they are missing on the page is balsa with epoxy polymer, it's light and very strong.

There's a chart on this page with strenth vs temps for Plastics, Ceramics, Glass, Concrete, Wood and Metals, GFRP is Glass Fibre Reinforced Polymer:

http://www.tangram.co.uk/TI-Polymer-High_temperature_plastics.html

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