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My puppy chewed the power plug off of my space heater, and I'd rather not buy a whole new space heater if I don't have to. I went to the hardware store and found a plug rated for 125V and 15A. The space heater cord is labeled for 300V, but the device says 120V and 1500W. Will the plug be safe for the space heater? Based on the wattage, it should only draw around 12.5A, but I don't know if it needs a certain amount of buffer in case it spikes high or anything like that.

Also: I have to chop off the chewed parts of the cord, and it was already a short cord begin with. Is it possible to add in more cord so it's the same length as before?

  • Is the puppy less likely to chew the new cord? All the more reason to replace all of it. – JDługosz Jan 25 '15 at 12:40
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    @jdlugosz: She's less likely to be left alone with the new cord... – Brendan Jan 25 '15 at 15:41
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By all common sense you should not try to splice an appliance cord to make it longer. What you should really do is to open up the appliance and remove the remaining chewed off chunck of cord. This may require you to free any type of cord retainers and / or strain reliefs.

Then a new cord of ratings same as the original should be installed in place of the old one. It can be very handy to purchase a ready made extension cord that has nice molded ends on it (rated properly of course) and cut the socket end off of it and use the remaining part to wire into the heater.

Sometimes you will find that inside the appliance the wires may be attached with some type of crimp on terminals. These types of terminals are generally available at hardware stores but if you cannot find exactly what you need check online at retailers such as Digikey or Mouser.

  • Thank you for your suggestion! I would have to disassemble the bottom of the heater to try and find where the cable attaches to see if I can replace the entire cord. In the meantime, it was cold so I cut off the chewed part of the cord and attached the plug. – Brendan Jan 25 '15 at 15:46
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The voltage rating of 300V is irrelevant because you'll only be using a 120V power system. All it means is that the original plug is capable of being used with higher-voltage systems (240V plus some room to spare) even though the heater it was attached to probably isn't.

As you said, 1500 W at 120V is 12.5 amps, so a plug rated for 15A should be fine. Note that, being that the heater is rated for 1500 W, many users will be plugging it into circuits whose wiring (or at least fuse/breaker) is only rated for 15A.

I would not recommend splicing to extend the cord. Instead, why not just cut it off really short and use a high quality extension cord to achieve the length you want? You could do like Michael said and replace the cord entirely, but I think that's significantly more work and more risk if you're not experienced doing that.

  • I worry that the splice would not handle the current properly. – JDługosz Jan 25 '15 at 12:38
  • @jdlugosz: That's part of why I said don't splice. Just attach the new plug to what's left of the cable and then plug it into a high-quality extension cord. – R.. Jan 26 '15 at 1:32

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