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I have a land with 17x12 =204 sqm. I want to use just 12x10 =120 sqm for my unit, so 84 sqm is the outside of the unit.

I want to design my unit that has very open space for the living room. I also want to have a big kitchen.

The unit should have 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 1 laundry, 1 kitchen and 1 living room.

Here is what I designed my unit, but I am not sure it is the best design. enter image description here

In the picture, each cell represent 1 sqm. The entrance is at the back of the unit. There is a balcony but no enstrace in the front of the unit

Can u come up different design for my unit?

closed as primarily opinion-based by Ecnerwal, keshlam, Niall C. Dec 3 '14 at 1:31

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • It would be hard to create a worse layout for a house than that. It will be really hard to get a good open layout with a square house that's not huge. – DMoore Dec 3 '14 at 3:17
  • For what it's worth, 150 square meters is 1614 square feet. That's larger than my 4BR/2-bath house. But I agree that open plan, square, largeish bedrooms, and trying to maximize the living room are pulling in conflicting directions; something may have to give. – keshlam Dec 3 '14 at 13:20
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"Can you come up with a different design?"

Many. Enough that it isn't worth describing any one of them.

"How to design...?"

That's an endless topic, but I can suggest a few starting points:

Think about how you're actually going to use the space, for everything from large parties to quiet times to needing to get away from each other.

Think about how much time you're going to spend where, what furnishings are going to go where, and what that says about how space should be distributed.

Think about sound isolation.

Think about traffic patterns, and make things as convenient as possible.

Think about whether you really want/need two full baths. Think about whether one of them wants to be attached to a bedroom to create a "master suite".

Think about whether some of these functions can share some of their floor space -- eg, if the laundry room can be combined into one of the baths or the kitchen, that may free up space to be used for other purposes. Plumbing work may be cheaper if most of the things which use water are close to each other (sharing a "wet wall", for example).

Think about whether you're designing for you own needs and don't care if it's too odd to sell easily or for a good price, or whether you're designing it for resale value and need to conform to current conventions, or something between the two.

And so on. And on. And on. There's no single best answer to any of these questions. If you're designing, you need to work through all the tradeoffs, look at lots of other designs for ideas, and generally spend time drawing up alternatives until you find one you're satisfied with.

Remember that non-loadbearing walls can be added or ripped out later, and even things like plumbing can be relocated to some extent. Doing so may not be cheap, but you do have that option if you decide you've really made a serious mistake.

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