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I installed new vinyl windows and now need to caulk them to the drywall of the window boxes on the interior side. What kind of caulk should I use? I've generally been using a nice silicone caulk, but it's not paintable and I anticipate eventually repainting the window boxes. If I use latex caulk, that'll work for repainting, but the old windows used latex caulk and it was brittle as a pretzel stick by the time I removed it.

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I was going to say just acrylic latex (aka 'alex'). But since you don't like that or silicone, how about alex + silicone? :) For example:

enter image description here

http://www.amazon.com/18128-Acrylic-Latex-Silicone-5-5-Ounce/dp/B00130BWLM/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1415915327&sr=8-1&keywords=acrylic+latex+silicone+caulk

The product is intended to address the relative weaknesses of each component. It's paintable, but supposed to be more flexible and better able to expand and contract with temp change.

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    ...and whatever deity you believe in or swear at (without implying belief is required for that purpose) protect you if you get it in the illustrated package. Caulk is not toothpaste, and putting it in a toothpaste tube just makes more caulk you have to throw out when it refuses to dispense reasonably and you have to go buy a 10 oz caulking gun tube anyway. As for the type of caulk, given the stated conditions, probably yes and +1 (though I also wonder about polyurethane caulking, but don't know how paintable it is off the top of my head.) – Ecnerwal Nov 13 '14 at 22:07
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    100% agreed, use caulk gun. Picture only meant to illustrate example product (i.e. the label and description was legible in this image). – bobfandango Nov 13 '14 at 22:11
  • Yes, I have a nice caulk gun. :) – iLikeDirt Nov 13 '14 at 22:12
  • I never used polyurethane, but quick research reveals a few tidbits of info. First, it is paintable which is good. Second, it is quite flexible which is also good. Third, but not so good IMHO, is it is solvent based which means messy to cleanup and stinks while curing. Last, and also not so good, it takes a relatively long time to cure. For reference: oldhousejournal.com/the_short_course_on_caulk/magazine/1417 – bobfandango Nov 13 '14 at 22:20

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