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So, I have a cheepo corner computer desk that has served me well over the years. To accommodate a gaming keypad, I widened the keyboard tray. I made the new tray out of particle board and it's shape isn't bad, unfortunately it's uncovered and could look better. If possible, I'd like to use the same type of paper they used for the desk, or something similar if I could find it. Problem is, I have no idea of where to find it, or even what the technical term for it is.

The stuff on the furniture doesn't even try to look like wood, it's just a semi glossy black material. It's very thin, and tends to peel of when wet.

If anyone knows what this is called, or where I could get some, i'd greatly appreciate it.

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Most factory furniture is covered in a thermal foil resin paper. It's not something you can purchase or work with as a consumer. You could probably make a pretty close match by covering the piece with some matte black laminate which is pretty easy to work with and will hold up much better than the desk itself. A counter top maker would probably sell you a remnant on the cheap.

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Other suggestion; drawer liner (should be available locally).

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Placed over a coat of semi-gloss black paint, which doesn't tend to peel off when wet.

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You can do something similar using paint, possibly even spray paint. Use a primer first, possibly two coats if it's soaking in. Then a couple coats of black, sanding with a very fine (eg 400 grit) sandpaper in between. Finally, use a clear coat gloss layer or two, again, with very fine (800 grit) sanding between coats.

I've done this for a couple small-ish projects, but I'm far from an expert at it (and I may have gotten the sand paper grits to use wrong -- please correct me if so). I'd recommend picking up a pack of a few different types, as what works best may depend on the material and paint you use. Biggest thing is it takes some patience.. don't rush it, and realize it won't look right after the first (and maybe second) coat. Thin, even layers are key.

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