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I have a bed that I have been building - it has 4x4's for the legs, and I want to attach the frame of the bed (the part of the bed that runs from front legs to back legs, structural support) to the front and back legs.

I dont really want to just screw it to the 4x4's, but would prefer to have a carriage bolt that provide more modularity to the bed. Are there any kinds of deep nuts I could insert into the legs that I can screw a carriage bolt into? Basically so I can easily screw it in and unscrew it for dis-assembly. I have seen shelves and dressers we have bought that have these kinds of recessed nuts that you can screw a bolt into when assembling.

Just wondering if anything exists for home use?

Here is an image of what I am doing:

bed frame

The brown pieces are what I want to attach to the posts/legs. I will then have supports along the 88 1/2 piece of wood that will span the width with 2x4's to provide a base for the box spring. Since it is a load bearing piece, I would like for it to be strong.

closed as off-topic by Tester101 Oct 25 '14 at 12:51

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions seeking product or service recommendations are off-topic because they tend to become obsolete quickly. Instead, describe your situation and the specific problem you're trying to solve." – Tester101
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    It was ludicrous to close this question. The question was "how to attach the side rails". How much more DIY could this be? – Michael Karas Oct 25 '14 at 13:13
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    Since your very good question got closed I have been left with no choice but to respond to you here in the comments section. First off you will not be using "carriage bolts" to fasten the side rails. Carriage bolts have round top heads and a square part under the head. These are meant to be pounded into a hole and have a washer and nut be used on the other end of the bolt where it protrudes through the wood. Second big issue is the use of the 2x4 side rail. There just plain won't be enough support from bolting a narrow 2x4 so near the end of the (continued) – Michael Karas Oct 25 '14 at 13:22
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    (continued from above) 4x4 posts. I recommend that you use at least a 2x10 side rail so that you can spread out the attachment points across the wider area to reduce the lever arm length of the posts. This will go a long way to keep the frame from getting rickety as pressure is applied laterally to the tops of the head and foot posts. The conventional wisdom would be to accommodate the wide side rails by having them come up along side the mattress stack. The support for the stackup is attached to the inside bottom edge of the 2x10 side rail. Last thing to consider (continued) – Michael Karas Oct 25 '14 at 13:31
  • (continued from above) is that the that the wood inserts should be larger than the ones that you found at Amazon. I would suggest that you use something at least an inch long (~25mm) and a bolt size of 5/16" or greater. Suitable inserts could be found here: catalogds.com/db/… or here: fastenright.com/insert-nuts-for-wood-type-d – Michael Karas Oct 25 '14 at 13:36
  • @tester101 There's actually a special bolt called a bed bolt (appropriately enough) designed specially for this exact application. They have been used since...people stated sleeping in beds. When it comes to furniture making things don't change often or quickly. – user23534 Oct 26 '14 at 2:58
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I found what I needed! I happened to stumble upon it after posting this.

What I need are "Wood Insert Interface Screws". This will allow me to screw these into the wood, while using a carriage bolt to screw into this. Hope this helps someone.

  • I hope that you find longer ones closer to 2.5 inches (63.5mm) rather than using those short ones (15mm). And that you use more than one bolt per end of the side rails. – Dan D. Oct 25 '14 at 8:07

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