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I'm trying to rig something up so I can get cold, warmish, or downright hot water in my garden hose, depending on need. I'm looking for some kind of fitting to mix cold and hot supply lines, and for the resulting mixed water to connect back to the spigot. I have PEX lines if that matters.

I've looked at using 2 valves, one on each supply line, and a T fitting. I could vary the opening of each valve to get to the desired temperature. But somehow I don't feel like this is the right way. I think opening valves halfway damages them? Also I feel that hot water could get back into the cold line that way?

Then I found this thing called a thermostatic valve. I think I can vary from getting 100% cold to 100% hot and everything in between? Or is there a safety setting which stops me from getting 100% cold or hot?

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    "Opening valves halfway" to mix hot/cold is how plumbing has worked for well over a hundred years already. – DA01 Sep 23 '14 at 16:51
  • What do you intend to use the hot water for? I have both hot and cold water available for my hose, but I tend to never use the hot water as I find it doesn't last very long. If you have a standard (Non-tankless) water heater, you might be very surprised how quickly you can deplete the hot water with a standard hose. – cyclops Feb 21 at 21:41
  • Actually at 'garden' rate (15L/min) a standard 80L thank (at 70°) will last less than 10 minutes (with cold supply being 10° and desired temperature being 45°) – DDS Feb 22 at 13:52
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You might want to consider installing a utility/laundry faucet, in place of the spigot. This will allow you to connect both hot and cold supply lines, and will have a built in mixing valve to allow you to vary the temperature of the water. They also tend to have the proper threads on the spout, to allow the attachment of a garden hose.

Utility Faucet

You'll have to find a way to support the faucet, as you don't want it just hanging by the supply lines. I've seen them with all different types of attachment methods, including holes to allow them to be screwed to the wall/washtub. You'll also want to make sure you have a shutoff valve on each supply within the conditioned space of the house. It's also a good idea to have a way to drain the lines once they're shut off, if you live in an area with harsh winters.

The only other problem, is that garden hoses are not designed to be used with warm/hot water. So you may experience problems from additional contaminants in the water, to accelerated deterioration of the hose.

  • I'd worry about that particular faucet in areas where winter brings hard freezes. Brass likes to split. It might be best to put the mixer valve well inside, and then use a single, weather-proof valve on the outside. A bit of a pain to get the right temperature, but replacing a split and leaking valve in January is not fun. – Wayfaring Stranger Jun 30 '17 at 0:39
  • A great way to mount a faucet is on a slop sink. – Harper - Reinstate Monica Jun 30 '17 at 1:11
  • Garden hoses left in the sun can get pretty hot, so it shouldn't be too bad. Many are perfectly OK feeding hot water (though the combination of hot water and mains pressure may cause issues at the connectors). The probalem is the usual one of trying to find decent specifications for consumer kit. – Chris H Jun 30 '17 at 10:36
  • Wouldn’t you need a backflow preventer to keep your potable water safe? – Lee Sam Feb 21 at 22:57
  • @LeeSam Yes, if that's required in your area. – Tester101 Mar 1 at 15:10
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You might be overthinking this.

Grab a portable dishwasher adapter and screw it on the aerator threads of a faucet. Hose connection done by adapter, mixing valve done by faucet, done.

  • Skip the dishwasher adapter, there are more direct adapters to do this job than there are dishwasher adapters (which make matching your dishwasher adapter to the faucet a chore). – BPugh Sep 24 '14 at 14:44
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I've looked at using 2 valves, one on each supply line, and a T fitting. I could vary the opening of each valve to get to the desired temperature. But somehow I don't feel like this is the right way. I think opening valves halfway damages them? Also I feel that hot water could get back into the cold line that way?

Yes, you are overthinking this. How do you think your sink / bath taps work?

You said "garden hose" so I will assume it's wanted outside, in the garden.

The cheap way is just add a hot line right beside the existing cold line. Use exactly the same pipe and fittings, buy a red handle instead of a blue one. Get a washing machine Y-hose to mix hot and cold.

The fancy way involves any tap assembly that suits your needs (plumbing, cosmetic, budget etc) and simply replace the existing output connection with one that takes a garden hose fitting.

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I just did this......I laid my 2 garden hoses out in the sun............In about 30 minutes I will take a combat shower.

I will get awesome more than enough hot water to wash, and when the hot water runs out, I will get real cold water from the well to rinse, and it will close all the pours on my skin.

Simplicity is the answer.

  • while the OP never specified why he wanted the hot water, I believe his intent was to get more than what a garden hose is gonna supply. I'm also fairly certain he wants it on-demand instead of having to wait for the sun to warm the water. Either way, this is a good point for someone looking for this type of niche solution even if it might be off topic for this thread. – kinar Jul 5 '16 at 15:13

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