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I have two different type of flooring on my second floor. I have almost 30 sqm with dry pine flooring (four rooms), and 8 sqm with vinyl (one room). The pine planks are not nailed to the floor, I can lift the planks with my fingers.

I have two alternatives, as far as I can see.

  1. Change the vinyl to pine flooring.
  2. Change all floors to engineered hardwood flooring

I have been "the helping hand" when laying EHF once, but other than that I have no experience.

My question is:

What would require the least effort / be simplest? I would need to sand and oil the existing pine floor if I decide to keep it. I guess it would take quite some time on 30 sqm floor to make it look nice.

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  • When you say "parquet" do you mean actual parquet or just hard wood? Or laminate? Your English is awesome by the way.
    – user23534
    Sep 19 '14 at 14:59
  • @paperstreet, it might be that my sub-optimal English has led to some confusion. By parquet I mean "planks" that are usually 220x20cm and installed the same way you would install laminate floors. It's pretty much similar to laminate only the top layer is actually approximately 1-3 millimeters of hard wood (for instance oak) instead of laminate. Sep 22 '14 at 11:37
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    Aha. That's what we would call engineered hardwood (hardwood on top composite on the bottom). It probably has different names in different places though, for all I know it may well be called parquet in your neck of the woods:) I'll post an answer here shortly.
    – user23534
    Sep 22 '14 at 22:57
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If it were me I would give serious thought to replacing both with engineered hardwood flooring. If your pine were in perfect shape and properly installed it would be worth trying to save and match it. But if it's not nailed down as you mentioned you can't hope to sand it out with any consistency and if it's very old you might have trouble matching the color/grain pattern etc. (softwoods tend to enrich their color over time in a way that's very hard to reproduce and old grown pine looks very different from farmed pines).

The one warning I will give you (and this is the case with any flooring) is that your floor will only be as good as the prep to the substructure. I can't stress this enough. Take whatever steps are necessary to get your base as perfectly solid, stable, flat and level as possible, especially if the grade changes as it appears to do where it transitions from wood to vinyl. Installing EHF is easy if your substructure is good but impossible if it's bad. Best of luck!

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  • Thank you! This was a tricky one... I like the pine floor, but I'm not sure if I can get a matching new floor beside it. At least with EHF I know the result will be good. I think I know the answer to this one but: It's a lot easier to install and maintain EHF flooring right? Sep 23 '14 at 9:07
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    Relative to traditionl hardwood yes, on both counts. The finish they use on quality EHF is much harder than anything you could apply in the field so it requires less up keep. And because the surface is real wood, when it does eventually start to show its age it can be sanded and refinished.
    – user23534
    Sep 23 '14 at 10:59
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If this is what you mean by parquet, I don't suggest it. If water ever penetrates (which it will if spilled on) this floor is over with. That real wood you have there is gorgeous. Refinish it by sanding, stain if you want and varnish it with a lamb's wool mop, using oil-based products. Replace the vinyl with as close a match as possible (same plank width, thickness, grain structure and color) and do it all in one shot. Sand a piece of your wood and take it to the store to match it. If it doesn't look 100% alike, or even if it is a completely different type, a threshold at the parting line will make it 'all better now'. If you don't have access to professional flooring equipment, I suggest getting a random orbit sander, it will be worth every penny for this job.

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    Thanks for your answer, and I apologize for the late response. It might be that my sub-optimal English has led to some confusion. By parquet I mean planks that are usually 220x20cm and installed the same way you would install laminate floors. I would think the floor I have now would take more damage if spilled on than parquet floors (at least the ones I'm thinking about). It probably won't change your answer much though =) Sep 22 '14 at 10:49

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