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We live in a log home that has yellow pine on the interior which has been sanded and sealed. After many years, it is now a beautiful warm honey color. We just replaced all the windows. They are aluminum clad outside but the interior is white pine and is supposed to be stained to match. However, all of the stain samples they have shown us look terrible-- they are either way too brown or way too red. We were told that it cannot be matched. Apparently, the contractor for the staining had Home Depot and Sherwin Williams try to match.

Can we match the new windows to the existing wood in our house, and if so, how?

  • Michele, Were you able to stain the white pine to look like yellow pine? I have a similar issue of trying to stain my white pine to look like yellow. – user39683 Jul 22 '15 at 2:38
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With a little trial and error the stain can be matched, color wise. The character of the grain never will, but that minor detail will not stand out. My windows are stained pine with stained poplar trim surrounding the sash. The wood that makes up the sash does not have the size to make it a problem with the other specie of wood that is in the area. Do make a test sample to get the color adjusted to the right color. Use white pine for that too needless to say. I have made samples... got what I though was a good match, and when the finish was applied, it was still off. I have adjusted the color further by adding a little stain to the finish. In this case, I am using oil based finishes. I do not have any experience in doing this with water based finish and stain. I would think the effect is the same though. Do not add no more than 20-25% stain to the finish to tone the color of the finish. I am told it will make the finish too soft.

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Everything Jack told you is correct. I will add a few thoughts on how to get the color close. i can visualize the color you are looking for, a deeply patina yellow pine that has a golden glow. Thinking minwax stains, you may want to start with something like golden oak, pecan or cherry, oil based stains. you can fade the more intense colors by adding natural(clear). This is a trial and error process and you will need a piece of white pine to test your combos on. Use a small plastic cup and measuring spoons to create your custom stain. This will allow you to write down the proportions so you can recreate it in larger batches. Another product that might be a good starter is "Honey Pine" Polyshades. Polyshades is a colored urethane. You can however also customize this color a bit with clear urethane or smaller amounts of stain. If you use a bit too much stain to poly, you may have to put a couple of coats of clear over the color to get a good hard finish. I'm sure with a little practice and perseverance, you will come up with an acceptable match.

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Try a honey pine stain an 2 coats of varnish,thinly with the stain or it will take on red/orange tint. Varnish gives instant yellow effect.wait a year and all will match the older stuff.my whole place looks the same.

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I live in a 250 year old house with yellow pine heartwood in the library. I used a mixture of Ipswitch pine and Fruitwood. I played with it awhile and it is a perfect match. I did this in 1979 and it has aged perfectly alongside the yellow pine.

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