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I just recently purchased an older home in Chicago, Il built in 1972 and I am replacing an outlet with a GFCI receptacle. When I pulled the original outlet from the conduit box. I found 9 wires on the outlet. 4 black and 5 white. One of the black wires is hot and one white is also hot. The instruction that came with the GFCI read I should call an electrician, but I am trying to avoid having to do that.

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    What does on the outlet mean? Can you include a picture? – bib Feb 6 '14 at 3:23
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    Is half of the receptacle controlled by a switch? – Tester101 Feb 6 '14 at 10:42
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    @rodney: How did you conclude the one white is "hot"? Is it "not hot" when you flip some switch? – ThePopMachine Feb 6 '14 at 16:16
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    Finding a hot white wire generally means 'call an electrician'. – Bryce Feb 7 '14 at 0:53
  • -1 for lack of followup to the comments. This should likely be closed as "unclear what you're asking" pending a response from the OP. – BMitch Apr 7 '14 at 13:58
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If you want all wires to go through the GFCI

  1. Connect the hot black and white to the LINE terminals
  2. Cut a short piece of white and a short piece of black and connect to the LOAD terminals
  3. Connect the other end of the short black and all the other blacks together with a wire nut. Do the same with the whites.

If you want some connections to not go through the GFCI

  1. Cut two short pieces of black and two short pieces of white
  2. Connect these to the LINE and LOAD terminals
  3. Connect the short wires connected to the LINE terminal to the incoming hot wires and the wires you DO NOT WANT to go through the GFCI with wire nut connectors
  4. Connect the short wires connected to the LOAD terminals to wires you DO WANT to go through the GFCI with wire nut connectors

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