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I recently replaced the some floodlamps with LED lights. The problem is some of the LEDs are blinking or flashing even though the switch is off. Some do not blink at all. It happens all the time. Is it harmful or can it cause a house fire?

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  • Can you provide more details and clean up your question? Hard to tell what is wrong.
    – DMoore
    Aug 30 '13 at 3:25
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    Possible duplicate: How can I prevent these LEDs from blinking when turned off?
    – BMitch
    Aug 30 '13 at 3:35
  • Is the circuit on a dimmer? If so, You may need a newer style dimmer that allows a cleaner 'off' setting. See the answers bmitch has referenced
    – HerrBag
    Aug 30 '13 at 19:48
  • Is it a basic toggle switch or is it illuminated, digital or otherwise active?
    – bib
    Aug 31 '13 at 0:37
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It appears to be a bad/weak/intermittent switch. I highly advise you to replace it!

SDsolar commented:In the comments to the answer is a link to a similar article where it is said that the ground wire was not at the same potential as the neutral, and that ungrounding it solved their problem. Not that it would seem an ideal solution, of course. And you might be right about an intermittent switch. But I'd suggest you flesh out your answer with examples to support your answer. – SDsolar yesterday

When you have a different potential between the neutral and load and ground and load, it would mean a measurable voltage between ground and neutral. That would mean that the potential in the neutral is being "bled off", resulting in a lower voltage being applied to the load.This will cause "non dimmable" LED lights to flash

It would seem in the above case, that "un-grounding stopped the voltage on the neutral line to stop being "bled off", leaving a greater potential (voltage) between the neutral and load...enough to stop the flashing. I would be curious where they measured the potential difference. If the switch were still attached, and they measured at the screw terminals, I would suspect the switch is at fault. I hope I am more clear now, SDsolar.

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    Welcome to stackexchange. Be sure to take the tour. In the comments to the answer is a link to a similar article where it is said that the ground wire was not at the same potential as the neutral, and that ungrounding it solved their problem. Not that it would seem an ideal solution, of course. And you might be right about an intermittent switch. But I'd suggest you flesh out your answer with examples to support your answer.
    – SDsolar
    Mar 15 '17 at 18:17

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