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Trying to connect a pendant light with one blue, one red, and one green/yellow wire.

Picture of my ceiling: Copper wire, Black single wire, two white wires (they were connected, and I found later one was hot, so I marked it with black tape. I left them separate to show the difference in the picture). I did not use the other wires, two black and one white that are connected. I believe the 2 black are hot and the white is neutral but I am not sure.

The first time I connected, green/yellow to house ground, black to red, and blue to 2 whites, the light turned on, but when I turned it off to mount the housing it would not come on again. I have taken it down a couple of times and tried to rewire but it is still not working. Any suggestions will be greatly appreciated!

Ceiling wires for pendant light, LED

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    Your ceiling colors sound like US/Canada. Your light colors sound like something else. Is the light listed for US/Canada us - UL, ETL or similar? Commented May 19 at 2:23
  • Your “hot” white wire is probably a neutral coming from an another light. It’s reading as hot because the voltage is flowing through the other light. You’ll probably now find a light that no longer works.
    – DoxyLover
    Commented May 19 at 6:47
  • Ok that makes sense, thank you! What about the two black and one white?
    – tlane
    Commented May 19 at 13:12
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    This is US wiring. The light was manufactured in China and came with minimal directions. Ill try to upload a pix of the directions.
    – tlane
    Commented May 19 at 13:15
  • The light is (nominally) designed for worldwide use. The problem is that if, as I suspect is the case, it has not been properly tested/listed for use in the US with a NRTL (UL, ETL, etc.) then if there should ever be a problem - e.g., a fire caused by a fault in this light fixture - your insurance will not pay. Basically all hard-wired equipment needs to either be UL or ETL (or comparable, but those are the main ones) listed or be specifically approved (i.e., gone through a permit process with the local inspector). Commented May 19 at 13:57

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