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I need to point the ridge of my roof which is at around a 30-40 degree angle. I've done some quick patches before but trying to juggle a small amount of concrete in a bucket with a rope attached while filling small holes was a trial.

Does anyone have any tips on how to secure a bucket on a ridge roof without needing to drill in a ridge anchor? Even then the bucket is at a very bad angle and hard to move with. at least with my tools I can hook them over the ridge or attach them to my harness

The roof is a standard ridge with the interlocking wavy masonry tiles (I don't know the right term for them, they're heavy and very textured. I need to drill holes before nailing them onto the beams to prevent them cracking)

The ridge itself is made of half cylinder type type tiles so there's really nowhere stable on the roof to leave a bucket except for one chimney that I can prop against but I don't want to be running back and forth trying to get a bucket of cement down before it starts hardening

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  • A second person might be the easiest. Can make a small platform that would sit over the ridge, something like a tv dinner tray.
    – crip659
    Commented Apr 30 at 20:11
  • You generally want to minimise the amount of walking done on a concrete tile roof too - walking puts all your weight on one foot. Try and "spread out" more to not crack any tiles.
    – Criggie
    Commented May 1 at 4:57

2 Answers 2

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Build youself a small bench similar to the picture that can sit across the ridge and provide a flat space to hold your bucket. Obviously you would need to adjust the dimensions and angles to work with your particular roof.

enter image description here

(Graphic prepared with free Personal Use Fusion360)

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  • Soft rubber feet or strips would go a long way to keeping this in position.
    – isherwood
    Commented May 1 at 13:58
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I would cobble a cradle together out of some framing. It can be scraps, since none of the parts need to be of any great length. It will hook over the peak and rest on one side of the roof. enter image description here

If you do go for this option, not knowing how much spread or how wide the load will be, do make the jig a bit wider and spread the material I have shown as 2X4s, the longest pieces, The hook and support for the table are drawn as 2X6s and th table can be plywood 12, 14, or 16" wide by 24" long, more or less as needed. But the assembly needs to be spread wider accordingly. Everything is nailed or screwed together.

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    I like the suggestion but because of the cylinder caps it would be difficult to get the right angle for the "hook" and it may not bite well enough to prevent knocking it off the peak. Plus I could kick it the wrong way over the peak towards the anchor Commented May 1 at 5:27
  • If you do go for this option, not knowing how much spread or how wide the load will be, do make the jig a bit wider and spread the material I have shown as 2X4s, the longest pieces, The hook and support for the table are drawn as 2X6s and th table can be plywood 12, 14, or 16" wide by 24" long, more or less as needed. But the assembly needs to be spread wider accordingly.
    – Jack
    Commented May 1 at 13:54

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