1

I don't know if I'm having a brain fart and this saw has always done this, or my more recent cuts required being more accurate, but my Craftsman circular saw cuts about an 1/8" to the right of the notch cutout. Is this normal, I thought it was aligned with the center to right side within the notch?

I replaced the blade and took it back off again to make sure it is 100% aligned, in it's notch (the blade hole), sitting flush and tightened completely.

I don't see any lateral movement on the saw that would adjust that notch to the blade. I also looked for bent or damage but don't see any either. I know the left side of the notch says 45 degrees and I get that for when the saw is tilted at a 45 but this is flat. I put that blue painters tape to basically put where the alignment is (still needing to account for saw blade width of cut).

Is this normal or is something amiss with this saw setup?

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

Here are pictures of the arbor to show I still can't see why the blade would be bumped out.

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

4
  • 1
    Was your saw ever dropped? That could have bent the shoe enough to explain what you're seeing. (Full disclosure...I dropped mine and had to bend it back.)
    – Duston
    Commented Mar 28 at 14:58
  • 1
    Normal that you're using the notch and it went wrong? Yes. Look at where the blade is at all times; that's what's happening. Notch gets you to within an eighth inch either way, then you kiss it with the blade. The rest is your job.
    – Mazura
    Commented Mar 29 at 21:29
  • Making your own track, rather than relying on the notch in the deck, is pretty easy. Get a thin board for the base, attach (glue) a straight rail to it, and then cut the board with the saw deck against the rail. You now have a track that can be used for accurate cuts as long as you don't change the saw bevel.
    – BMitch
    Commented Apr 3 at 15:04
  • So what I ended up doing is buying a new Craftsman cordless circular saw that 100% cuts on the line and has an adjustable shoe in the case something gets it off the mark in the future. The fact this saw didn't have an adjustable shoe made it problematic. I'm going to donate my old saw here which is perfectly fine and works well to Habitat for Humanity for someone else to get a good working tool (that just needs a custom alignment mark).
    – atconway
    Commented Apr 17 at 23:11

2 Answers 2

2

I'm going to be blunt: Craftsman is not known for stellar quality in the 21st century. While they're an old and storied brand, they've largely sold out the name and become a budget label. I wouldn't be surprised if they're using ancient dies for the sheet metal table stamping even after revising the motor or housing. The fact that the table is stamped in the first place is telling--most higher quality saws have solid aluminum tables. The sheer size of the notch also says something about the level of precision they expect (although it's intended to accommodate cuts from 45° to 90°).

So, I'd do this:

  1. Using a guide fence of some sort, make a straight cut at least 18" long.

  2. Set the saw neutrally in the center (presumably straightest) part of the cut so the cut extends beyond the front of the table.

  3. Using an awl or knife and a small square, score two lines across the top of the table for a short distance, marking both sides of the cut position. You could scrape away the paint between the marks for better visibility.

  4. Completely disregard the notch. Optionally cut a new notch with your tool of choice.


To those who might argue that the notch is irrelevant or not to be trusted, there are many cases where a fairly accurate reference is helpful. For example, a plunge cut is much easier to align if the notch can be set on a marked line. Sometimes the blade can't be seen due to access constraints. In short, it's a very useful feature.

1
  • This is the right approach. I've owned a deWalt saw for 15 years, and out of the box it came with a misaligned notch. Two minutes later and a little mark with a file, issue fixed and it's been a nice saw since.
    – Cheery
    Commented Apr 3 at 16:35
4

Make sure you don't have a knockout or adapter from the previous blade stuck to the motor shaft or to the inboard side of the blade. That would move the kerf one blade thickness to the right.

I don't mean to state the obvious, but I've been known to look right at something and not see it. It's worth your time to take the blade off again just to have a look.

2
  • From the picture the blade is not in the middle of the blade guard, but is shifted to the outside. In my decades old Craftsman it is right in the middle. Commented Mar 28 at 17:04
  • So please take a look at my edit and additional photos. I've take it apart 3x and don't see why the blade is bumped out. The blade sits flush on the arbor. The arbor is 1-piece and I can't see anything stuck together. I've made sure the arbor is clear of saw dust and debris. It seems to be installed correctly. Do you see anything amiss?
    – atconway
    Commented Apr 3 at 3:30

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.