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This is a follow up this question: How can I rig a raising/lowering mechanism to my grill?

I get the sense that trying to make a fancy mechanism will be too much trouble, so I will go with steel dowels in the side.

Obviously I need to drill some holes, which will be no problem, but do I need to use some kind of sealant, like grouting or high temp silicone? Or should I just insert them dry?

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    IMO dry but tight would be fine. Who knows if whatever adhesive you might use will offgas with heat? They should really only undergo shear forces, which adhesive wouldn't really do much for.
    – Huesmann
    Mar 21 at 12:42
  • Before you start drilling holes, remember that it's hard to locate holes in masonry in exactly the spot that you want them. Drill bits wander as you start drilling, and once a divot forms, you can't reposition the hole. Your cooking grate is going to rock because of imprecision in dowel location. Instead, mount angle iron (or aluminum) to the masonry. The mounting holes in the angle can be made oversize (use washers) if the fasteners are not exactly in the right spot so you can adjust for level and height as needed, then tighten the fasteners to the angle iron. Grate will not rock.
    – MTA
    Mar 21 at 12:59
  • You're right about the wandering, but it's not hard to reposition. Either angling the bit right away to shift over or reforming the divot with hand tools works fine.
    – isherwood
    Mar 21 at 15:07
  • @Huesmann I have gone with dry tight fit. Seems to have worked well. However, I cannot accept a comment as an answer so if you want to post an answer, I will accept it. Mar 25 at 13:40
  • @ChechyLevas done. Got pics of how things shook out?
    – Huesmann
    Mar 26 at 14:25

3 Answers 3

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IMO dry but tight would be fine. Who knows if whatever adhesive you might use will offgas with heat? They should really only undergo shear forces, which adhesive wouldn't really do much for.

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Long story short- go with concrete anchors. They are all-metal, so you just put them in drilled holes, and tighten (mind the force, as they could crack bricks).

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  • The term is a bit vague. A photo (with credit) or a link would be great.
    – isherwood
    Mar 21 at 13:23
  • Incognito Google/Amazon search gives correct result for "concrete anchor". As for a specific type/purchase link- for such an application- let him take whatever his local hardware store has.
    – jakuboz
    Mar 21 at 14:59
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Not a sealant, but an adhesive--ideally something that's not too flexible, like epoxy.

You could also use sleeve anchors, removing the washer and nut after install. Just go easy--brick won't tolerate extreme stress.

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