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I've been having multiple random trips at my GFCI outlet in my food trailer. I have cleaned the outlet and made sure no moisture/ dust was present. I also rechecked the wiring on this outlet and it's fine. Could something in the box/ or the light plugged into it be causing the trips? I've tried everything and it keeps tripping every week or so. On this circuit are 2 roof mounted outlets, both are GFCI, both enclosed in weatherproof boxes, with 1 LED Outdoor floodlight plugged in (3 plugs unused). enter image description here

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    I am concern about the wires that seem to supply power to that box. They seem to be 12 gauge the same as for all those 20 amp breakers.
    – crip659
    Commented Mar 8 at 18:43
  • What else is plugged into that circuit? Commented Mar 8 at 19:07
  • Only 1 outdoor LED spot light. And the GFCI plug that trips is housed on the roof of the food trailer and is in a weatherproof box, free of moisture and dust. This outlet was installed by the builder of the trailer for exterior lighting. This is one of two outlets on the roof on the same circuit, and they are both GFCI plugs in weatherproof boxes. All other appliances and lights are on other circuits (which haven't been an issue.)
    – souza
    Commented Mar 8 at 20:13
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    If this is in the USA, there's a whole lot of weirdness going on. In addition to @crip659's comment about a bunch of breakers being fed from 12 ga wires, the top right, and two right side conduits only have black and bare ground. if they're not 240V, then that's wrong as well. In trying to trace those black wires, it looks like some come from other cables, and some from breakers. Personally, I wouldn't touch it with a 10' pole while energized.
    – Milwrdfan
    Commented Mar 8 at 21:57
  • Thank you for the response.. Both of the ports at the top right are going to switches, top right is a light switch, and right below is the knob switch for the hood exhaust. We have a 30 amp RV plug with wiring coming in (bottom middle conduit)
    – souza
    Commented Mar 8 at 22:08

2 Answers 2

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Things got a bit sidetracked by "food trailer", implying "refrigerator" and "motors" and so on. But the latest edit is the key:

On this circuit are 2 roof mounted outlets, both are GFCI, both enclosed in weatherproof boxes, with 1 LED Outdoor floodlight plugged in (3 plugs unused).

Plain and simple, outdoor GFCIs can trip a lot. Even with waterproof boxes. Why? Condensation. Which varies a lot by location, but can definitely trip a GFCI, either in the "waterproof box" or in the light fixture (box or fixture itself).

  • Make sure you do not have any non-metallic, non-waterproof cable running outside. That's a code violation and likely to lead to GFCI trips.
  • Unless you need the outdoor receptacles for something else, replace the outdoor receptacles with closed junction boxes and hardwire the lights.
  • If you do need receptacles, replace the GFCI/receptacle with weather-resistant simple receptacles.
  • Either replace the breaker for the circuit with a GFCI/breaker (if available) or install a GFCI/dead front (no receptacle, just GFCI and Test/Reset buttons) or a GFCI/receptacle in the circuit indoors with the wires to the outdoors connected to the load side of the GFCI.
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  1. There can be voltages induced into an object, particularly outdoors, that could trip a GFCI.

    • Ground currents can be caused by voltage between a power-line transformer and the house. For example, if there is a large current drawn by a house-hold appliance, even on another circuit, there could be a small voltage on the ostensibly grounded neutral, relative to the earth. Does the GFCI trip when a large load is drawn such as from a table saw or washing machine?
    • lightning, even at a fair distance, can induce a current. Doe the GFCI trip during storms?
    • A radio transmitter in the vicinity can induce currents. Any radio amateurs around?
  2. Electric motors commonly produce a surge when starting or stopping, which can cause a GFCI to trip. Refrigerators have electric motors to drive the compressor. A food trailer likely has a refrigerator.

    • You can add a snubber.

    • You can use a specialized GFCI, e.g. Class C, if code allows it.

    • Workaround: install a freezer alert that signals you inside the house when the GFCI shuts. Not a great idea, though... what if you're not at home (or you are, but it's 4 AM when it sounds)?

You definitely do need GFCI protection for an outdoor device!

The box wiring might not appear neat looking, but I see no obvious issue. It is unlikely that there is any fault in it. If you question it, have a licensed electrician check it out.

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  • This circuit has only 2 outlets and has an outdoor LED spotlight plugged into it. This outlet was installed by the builder of the trailer for exterior lighting. This is one of two outlets on the roof on the same circuit, and they are both GFCI plugs in weatherproof boxes. All other appliances and lights are on other circuits (which haven't been an issue.)
    – souza
    Commented Mar 8 at 20:23
  • You should edit the question to include what devices are on that circuit. Commented Mar 8 at 20:40

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