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My contractor cut the stud around the rough opening very aggressively to squeeze a wider door in, and I wonder how bad the damage is to the structure and what the consequences are.

Here are the details. My old door was 64” wide, but the new door ordered by the contractor mistakenly is 68”. Rather than replacing it with the correct width, he simply cut the stud around the rough opening and the jamb to make some room. I suppose there were two 2x4 studs on each side of the rough opening, and he almost removed one completely from each side. He also cut the jamb and the head of the door. Even with these cuttings, the door still could not fit in easily, thus he hammered it in as much as possible, but not completely. The brickmould of the door is not snug against the sheathing.

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    Is this still open? Run a drill into the side of the opening and see exactly how much wood is left. Sounds like the entire trimmer (header support) stud was removed, which could be a serious problem. Or not. Reducing the header may also have taken it out of spec.
    – isherwood
    Feb 21 at 19:41
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    We can't tell anything without knowing how much wood is left.
    – JACK
    Feb 21 at 19:42
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    I definitely don't like how the head jamb was mangled. That could leave it saggy as a head jamb shouldn't be fastened to the framing.
    – isherwood
    Feb 21 at 19:44
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    If the joists run parallel to the header, then there's probably no weight to support (confirming that your roof's load goes into the side walls would indicate for sure that the header carries no load). Looking up from below, the header has two plies oriented vertically. That's the typical indicator for a structural header. Knocking on the ceiling like you're searching for a stud would be the least invasive method to confirm the joist orientation. Then look parallel to the door's wall in line with the joists for another wall within, say, 20 ft.
    – popham
    Feb 22 at 17:46
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    The middle section of roof that slopes down toward the street has a vertically oriented bit of wall. That's the likely location for an interior load bearing wall. I would expect the hidden beam to be located directly under that wall line.
    – popham
    Feb 22 at 17:53

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