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This old oak stool has a snapped leg. This point of the leg is narrower and therefore vulnerable. A repair would need to be strong in order for the stool to be functional. It does match perfectly when the 2 pieces are put in place, but needs strenghtening. Thought about a dowel joint but it wouldn't be possible the perfectly position the two holes for a tight dowel fit. Is there a hack which would make this work? or another way to go about the repair? broken stool leg

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    You should ask this question on the woodworking stack. I suspect that an epoxy adhesive is your answer, although technically you would be gluing endgrain. I suspect that the jagged break forms a million little finger joints, overruling the conventional wisdom against gluing endgrain.
    – popham
    Dec 8, 2023 at 8:43
  • I think a leg replacement would be in order here. What I see doesn't look too complicated; the most complicated bit would be matching the color.
    – Huesmann
    Dec 8, 2023 at 14:16
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    @popham, I can say from experience (and reasoning) that and end-grain joint will not hold. If the original wood didn't, it won't again.
    – isherwood
    Dec 8, 2023 at 15:08

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I would make a template so that you can drill a hole for a dowel centrally on both pieces; even fixing the drill horizontally and setting its height would work.

Then I would use a metal pin for the dowel to give sufficient strength.

Based on comments: I would use a pin roughened or grooved to give sufficient grip - even threaded rod. This worked for me in a similar case, when I did not have a sufficiently large wood bit available - like about inch and a half or more.

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  • A glued wood dowel would provide much more pullout strength, though. I'd worry that a metal dowel wouldn't leave enough bond between the broken pieces. A dowel just under the interior square dimension should be plenty strong.
    – isherwood
    Dec 8, 2023 at 14:49
  • @isherwood if you use a smooth polished metal pin then I understand your comment. I would use a pin roughened or grooved to give sufficient grip. I described a method that worked for me in a similar case, when I did not have a sufficiently large wood bit available - like about inch and a half or more based on your description.
    – Solar Mike
    Dec 8, 2023 at 15:00
  • Could even use a threaded rod and epoxy. No way that would come out.
    – LarryBud
    Dec 8, 2023 at 15:06
  • Fair enough, but that detail would be better in your answer.
    – isherwood
    Dec 8, 2023 at 15:08

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