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I have a narrow channel between a metal support post and a framing stud. I'm thinking of using these 3M SI-1 cable stackers and trimming off the extra slot to make it fit and running (6) 14/2 NM-B "Romex" cables (doubling up with two cables per slot in the stacker).

The instructions state when using 5-8 14/2 cables, derating should be considered.

There will be (12) 14 gauge conductors. The Cerro Wire calculator (if I'm using it correctly) states the allowed ampacity to be 13 amps.

So this means I'd need to limit the amps in each circuit in this to 13 amps via the breaker? They won't make 13A, hence effectively I'd need to go down to 10A.

There are two circuits involved. One for nine LED puck lights and two ceiling fans = 3 amps. The other is a lighting circuit as well @ approx 3 amps. So limiting to 10 amps is fine

channel

ampacity

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  • What country? In the USA it would be exceptionally unusual to have a 120V branch circuit under 15A. I don't know whether or when it might be legal vs not. Nov 20, 2023 at 23:36
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    @GlennWillen yes USA and yes, rare indeed. I can't even find 10a breakers for this panel. I've just determined there isn't a way to make this work so re-routing some of the cables through the crawl space and a much longer run.
    – crichavin
    Nov 21, 2023 at 16:20

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So this means I'd need to limit the amps in each circuit in this to 13 amps via the breaker? They won't make 13a, hence effectively I'd need to go down to 10a.

While you could do this to meet the derating requirements, it would be very nonstandard. The normal practice for any type of voltage drop or derating requirement is to increase the wire gauge, so in this case, you'd use 12AWG on 15A circuits.

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  • Yes that would be the better route...can't even find 10a breakers for this panel. But then theses stackers are only rated for up to 4 - 12/2, so that wouldn't work either. I've just decided to route them through the crawl space via a much longer run, but it works.
    – crichavin
    Nov 21, 2023 at 16:16

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