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I have removed a wall and it has left gaps in the cornice. Any ideas?

I have explored a corbel as an option and have chased up pressed metal options but I am after ideas.

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  • what does the rest of the room look like - matching crown on all 4 walls? how big is the room? does the rest of the house have matching crown? Nov 18, 2023 at 6:13

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I'm no plasterer and neither was my dad, but he was inventive, and did this…

Get some Plasticene [children's modelling clay] & press it up against a matching section of the cornice further over. Best if it goes on warmed slightly then left to cool, so it hardens a bit.
Lift away & then make a small wooden box frame for it.
Use plaster of paris or similar & pour into the mould.
When set, trim/file/sand to fit the gap & glue in place.

I roughed out a Photoshop copy/paste that shows it should match up pretty well - obviously was originally done in one piece. That should make matching up a whole lot easier. [Tinted pink so you can see what I added]

enter image description here

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  • ^^ this, and maybe do a full pattern section (16 inches, maybe?) to have your joints in the somewhat more open area. Nov 18, 2023 at 14:40
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    @AloysiusDefenestrate you may not need to - & Plasticine isn't the most stable material in large areas.. I roughed out a Photoshop copy/paste that shows it should match up pretty well - obviously was originally done in one piece. That should make matching up a whole lot easier. But, yes, it might help to have some leeway on the join - it depends how well you can make the new cast, I guess.
    – Tetsujin
    Nov 18, 2023 at 14:47
  • Years ago, I remember seeing that same process - plaster of paris - used to make an entire custom profile piece of crown molding.
    – SteveSh
    Nov 18, 2023 at 15:14
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I would attempt to match the profile of the cornice. Even if you only come close it'll be much less conspicuous than a corbel at a seemingly random location.

  1. Cut a triangular block of wood to fit the gap which protrudes slightly proud of the cornice. You could screw several blocks together to get the necessary width.
  2. Set it in place and trace the original cornice on both sides.
  3. Using whatever tools you have, such as bandsaws, belt sanders, files and chisels, carve the block to match the shape of the cornice.
  4. Glue or nail the block into place.
  5. Fill the joint with suitable filler product, then sand lightly to blend.
  6. Optionally apply a paper embossed pattern such as you'd find at a craft store.
  7. Prime and paint.
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