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I'm confused on usage of these 2 breakers on a 20 amp circuit for outlets. All outlets are inside of house except kitchen and bathroom but few are located in a crawlspace also. Which one would be more appropriate to use it?

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Siemens-20-Amp-AFCI-GFCI-Dual-Function-Circuit-Breaker-Q120DFP/205488018

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Siemens-20-Amp-1-Pole-Dual-Function-CAFCI-GFCI-Plug-On-Neutral-Circuit-Breaker-Q120DFNP/312276201

The last one doesn't have a pigtail on it but still GFCI protection

This is my electrical panel https://www.lowes.com/pd/Siemens-200-Amp-30-Spaces-40-Circuit-Convertible-Main-Breaker-Panel-Load-Center/3533048

enter image description here

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  • The one without a pigtail only works with plug-on-neutral panels. Upload a picture of your panel and the label next to the panel. Commented Oct 20, 2023 at 15:57
  • this is my electrical panel lowes.com/pd/…
    – cadobe
    Commented Oct 20, 2023 at 16:11
  • No, that is a breaker panel of possibly the same model. What we need to see is YOUR panel. Commented Oct 20, 2023 at 17:44
  • @manassehkatz, I just added a picture of my electrical panel label.
    – cadobe
    Commented Jan 29 at 16:25

2 Answers 2

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Siemens Plug-On Neutral panels start with PN, SN, PWN or SWN. So this is not a Plug-On Neutral panel. Which means this regular AFCI/GFCI breaker should work but not the other one in the original post.

The rest of the post is a little confusing:

All outlets are inside of house except kitchen and bathroom but few are located in a crawlspace also.

That sounds like kitchen and bathroom are not inside of house, but that doesn't make much sense. So here are a few basic rules:

  • Most new receptacle circuits require AFCI, GFCI or both. Each recent version of the NEC has added more areas. Replacement of an existing circuit breaker does not normally force the circuit to be upgraded. Adding a new circuit does. Specifics depend on NEC version.
  • Practically speaking, AFCI has to be done at the breaker. GFCI can be done equally effectively, and often at a lower price, at the first receptacle in a circuit. So if you need AFCI, install an AFCI breaker. If you need AFCI and GFCI, install an AFCI/GFCI breaker. If you need only GFCI, install at the first receptacle (usually - exception if > 20A or 240V circuit).
  • Kitchen receptacle circuits generally need to be dedicated to kitchen and related areas. Old circuits that go all over the house are fine, but new ones must be dedicated.
  • Bathroom receptacle circuits generally need to be dedicated to bathrooms. Old circuits that go all over the house are fine, but new ones must be dedicated.
  • Kitchen, bathroom, crawlspace, garage, unfinished basement, laundry room and outdoor receptacles generally need GFCI protection. Most other areas don't, but again it depends on NEC version.

As you have found out, AFCI and GFCI breakers are relatively expensive. So unless you have specific reasons to upgrade to AFCI and/or GFCI, check your version of the NEC to see what you actually need. GFCI for kitchen and bathroom receptacles is pretty much a given (required for decades) but that can be done with GFCI/receptacle rather than GFCI/breaker.

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    Thanks @manassehkatz. Appreciate your in depth answer.
    – cadobe
    Commented Jan 30 at 17:34
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I believe that the proper way is to use just a CAFCI breaker with regular 20 amp outlets for inside and 20 amp GFCI outlets for the crawlspace. Simple as is.

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  • why the answer was down voted? Isn't this correct?
    – cadobe
    Commented Jan 29 at 16:24

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