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The power to my master bedroom stopped working. I changed my light fixture first from a ceiling fan/light combo, I'm getting power in room from what volt meter says. I have also changed outlets out to three prong from the old 2 prongs. This house was built in 69 and never been rewired.

What I need to know is what my wiring should look like on first outlet in room that also joined by the outlet in my living room.

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  • When you changed from 2-prong to 3-prong, how did you connect the grounds?
    – Cheery
    Sep 29, 2023 at 1:54
  • you were changing the wiring and now nothing works
    – Traveler
    Sep 29, 2023 at 2:02
  • There is no ground wire at all Sep 29, 2023 at 2:05
  • 2
    @GabrielleHulsey Are you aware that you can’t just put in plain 3-prong outlets unless the breaker is GFCI? You need GFCI outlets (or just one if the others are chained off of the Load terminals of the GFCI) and have to be marked “no ground”.
    – DoxyLover
    Sep 29, 2023 at 2:26
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    What does it look like now? What did it look like before you changed it? PHOTO, at least of the current situation, would be tremendously helpful.
    – keshlam
    Sep 29, 2023 at 2:52

1 Answer 1

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I changed my light fixture first from a ceiling fan/light combo

In order to do this, the ceiling junction box must be rated for a ceiling fan. Fans create vibration that will destroy non-fan-rated boxes, and may pry their nails out too! Revisit that issue and upgrade as necessary.

I have also changed outlets out to three prong from the old 2 prongs. This house was built in 69 and never been rewired. There is no ground wire at all...

Ground requirements were phased in from 1954 to 1965. By NEC 1965 they required grounding for every circuit that was not a dryer or range (sad story there).

If you do not see a ground WIRE, there's a significant possibility that you have metal boxes and the metal boxes are grounded... either a) by grounding sheaths on the type of wire used, or b) by use of metal conduit. Or there may be ground wires in the back of the box; it's very common for novices to not notice or state them.

Assuming your boxes are grounded... If the box is metal, you can ground the receptacles simply by using the better ($3) "spec grade" receptacles, which automatically pick up ground via contact blades on their mounting screws. The cheap ones will also pick it up if they have hard, clean, flush metal/metal contact with the metal box, however the little paper squares holding the screws on must be removed for that to work.

What I need to know is what my wiring should look like on first outlet in room that also joined by the outlet in my living room.

It should look exactly like you found it.

And, if "tabs" were broken off on the old receptacle, they need to be broken off on the new receptacle also. Failing to do so will either make light switches no longer work; or make a big spark and trip breaker(s).

If things simply stopped working, then look closely at the neutral wires (white, though not all whites are neutral) and make sure neutrals are exactly as you found them.

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