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I have an electrical panel in the corner of my room. The panel is on the back wall and the corner is top the right. However, the doors on the panel are hinged on the left. Is this acceptable?

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    Picture please. Sep 8, 2023 at 22:40
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    Where on the planet? Answer as written is USA rules, Canada is probably similar (often but not always the same) other parts of the planet may differ greatly. Edit your question to put that in, as well as the requested picture.
    – Ecnerwal
    Sep 8, 2023 at 23:03

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Answer as written is USA rules, Canada is probably similar (often but not always the same) other parts of the planet may differ greatly.

If the working space (always clear, never used for storage) of 30" wide (need not be centered, but must include the whole panel) 36" forward, and 6-1/2 feet high (or as high as the top of the equipment/panel if it is mounted higher) is maintained, and the door does allow access to the breakers and can be opened at least 90 degrees, the hinge direction is not called out. The whole deadfront, door, hinges, and all, will be removed if an electrician is working in the panel.

Working space being kept clear is (observed to be) frequently violated with a corner panel placement, so that's not ideal, but it seems you are asking about a panel in place, not one you can easily choose to put elsewhere at design time. Something like a welcome mat the correct size that you know you need to keep everything else off of may help. On a concrete floor, paint a patch and stencil "keep clear at all times" on it.

Many, but not all, panel deadfronts (the part with the door) can be rotated (installed the other way around.) Some have design features that don't permit that. Many have doors that can be opened much more than 90 degrees, if not blocked.

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If you have any choice as to location, you are much better putting it in a hallway, so that the mandatory working space naturally keeps itself clear.

If you are chained to the fact that the electric meter must be directly on the other side of the wall, you're operating on the old codebook. NEC 2020 requires a fireman's disconnect at the meter. For economic reasons, that "disconnect" is done by putting the main breaker there. That means the onward wiring is protected, and can go anywhere you want it to.

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