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About 30 years ago I used Rust-Oleum spray paint to put a textured fake stone finish on a wooden nightstand for my young son's room. (It worked with this decor, trust me.) Now I want to be able to paint that nightstand for the guestroom using Benjamin Moore Advance Aklyd paint. But I need to get that surface smooth.

Do I try to sand it off? Will it even come off? It's been remarkable durable for 30 years with no visible wear - no chips, peeling, loss of little "stones".

Is there something to put over it to level it, fill in, and create a smooth surface to work from?
Janet

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    If this is the stuff I've used, there are no "stones" -- the paint is just designed to create blobs which provide stone-like texture when you spray it on. Remove it like any other paint.
    – keshlam
    Sep 4, 2023 at 0:38
  • @keshlam if it's spray, that must be true - anything solid in the can would clog the nozzle
    – Chris H
    Sep 4, 2023 at 10:39

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Experiment. If testing reveals the "stone" bumps to be resistant to sanding, fill around them with something designed to be sanded smooth (like autobody putty.) If (as seems likely) they sand off without issue, just do that until the surface is smooth.

You can scrape or sand or use paint remover all the way to bare wood (but that is probably a great deal of needless work for a "more paint, just smooth" result.)

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  • Yes—if it's real wood and not particleboard, you could hit it with a primer-filler, then wet-sand it smooth.
    – Huesmann
    Sep 4, 2023 at 12:40
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Sand it.

Benjamin Moore Advance is a self-leveling alkyd and will lay down exceptionally (I have sprayed hundreds of gallons of this product).

I would sand the surface as smooth as you can get it either by hand or with a random orbital sander using 220 grit sandpaper, vacuum and then paint it as usual.

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