1

I am looking to reduce the amount of times I need to dump the dehumidifier bucket. The unit has an integrated pump so I was looking to install it permanently into the house in some manner.

The house does not have a floor drain (or so I think) or utility sink or central AC unit to connect it to.

I was wondering what would be the preferred approach to install it permanently. Would it make sense to pipe it into the main system drain. The kitchen sink, dish washer and washing machine are currently right around where I was thinking. Or would it make sense to behave like a solo spigot style drain outside of the house.

This is the current set up of the location:
enter image description here

enter image description here

4
  • 2
    This may depend on your local sewer rules. Some areas (generally the dry/desert ones) are happy to take all the water you can give them, and others are doing all they can to reduce inflow of water that does not actually need to be treated (such as dehumidifier condensate, sump pump discharge, etc.), but which adds to the flow at the treatment plant.
    – Ecnerwal
    Commented Aug 30, 2023 at 15:44
  • Thank you for your reply! We currently use a septic tank. Would that impact the drain? For area - we are northern CT.
    – Kevin L
    Commented Aug 30, 2023 at 15:52
  • 1
    My personal preference is to not send water not needing treatment to my septic tank, so I'd send it off to an outside drainage solution other than that. Or to a sump that eventually go to such a place, if available, but presumably you'd have mentioned one if you have one. But it's probably not enough to matter, much.
    – Ecnerwal
    Commented Aug 30, 2023 at 15:58
  • Suggestion: Ask the local inspector's office what the common (approved) solutions are in your area.
    – keshlam
    Commented Aug 30, 2023 at 16:47

4 Answers 4

1

I just used flexible tubing and ran mine into the same discharge pipe as the washing machine. Example: https://imgur.com/Q3n4D

4
  • Our washer is on our main floor so we do not have easy access to that opening. I can check if we can run it up and then down. The pump does say 15 feet.
    – Kevin L
    Commented Aug 30, 2023 at 15:59
  • This is the solution my boiler installers used.
    – keshlam
    Commented Aug 30, 2023 at 16:46
  • @KevinL was this not accurate? "The kitchen sink, dish washer and washing machine are currently right around where I was thinking." The washing machine drain has the advantage of being open and not requiring a run to outside.
    – Tiger Guy
    Commented Aug 30, 2023 at 20:46
  • 1
    @TigerGuy in the first image we will see from left to right the drains of the kitchen sink, dishwasher, and washing machine. The washing machine drain is open on the first floor. I was wondering if we could add a sanitary drain and trap as the others are. Running it directly outside seems to be the solution I am leaning towards.
    – Kevin L
    Commented Aug 31, 2023 at 16:19
0

You don't want to tap directly into any drain lines without a trap to block sewer gasses. I'd guess there is a floor drain somewhere, you just haven't found it yet. Best option if there truly isn't anywhere in your basement to drain is to pump it outside, and make sure it doesn't drop right next to your foundation. Is that plywood holding that vent fan next to the window? If so, then just drill a small hole for the drain hose (that you say has it's own pump) and route it out that way. Then if you ever do anything else with it, a small hole is easily patched in the wood.

4
  • 2
    No floor drain is a pretty common situation, IME.
    – Ecnerwal
    Commented Aug 30, 2023 at 16:11
  • There is a hole in the basement. The inspector when we were looking at the house had noted it but did not know its use. The vent fan does look like it is being held in with painted wood. That would likely be a great solution!
    – Kevin L
    Commented Aug 30, 2023 at 16:24
  • 1
    Seconded on this - just run it outside the house. Condensate is a small enough amount of water that you are quite unlikely to cause a problem dropping it even relatively close to the foundation.
    – KMJ
    Commented Aug 30, 2023 at 16:43
  • The fan looks to be a Nutone 8070 but the housing looks custom. When tapping on it it was feeling more plastic and wood but there are exterior wood supports that finish the housing. I would have to find where would be best to drill but so far it is looking promising.
    – Kevin L
    Commented Aug 30, 2023 at 17:29
0

We used to have a condensate pump in our furnace to gather water from the AC evaporator coil. The pump ran through a vinyl hose to a hole in the side of the house then down to the garden.

You could do the same: run the hose from the pump through a hole in the wall to wherever you would want to spill it.

0

It looks like your main drain is at shoulder height or higher in the basement. So draining the dehumidifier into it without a pump will be challenging. The dehumidifier would need to be attached to the ceiling and you would need to add a trap just above the main drain.

A much easier approach is to keep the dehumidifier on the floor and buy a condensate pump to pump the water outside. Send it a few feet away from your building.

3
  • I mean, it looks like there's a trap in the basement, just at the right of the1st pic. Perhaps the OP can tap a line in there. Although I'm not sure if some kind of backflow preventer would be needed on the condensate line.
    – Huesmann
    Commented Aug 31, 2023 at 12:22
  • Yes but @Huesmann it's up in the ceiling. Not useful for a basement dehumidifier without a pump. And once you add a condensate pump, it's so much easier to just pump it outside. If there was a slop sink you could perch the dehumidifier on a shelf above it, but in this basement the drain is too high for that.
    – jay613
    Commented Aug 31, 2023 at 20:11
  • 1
    Sure, but your solution still requires a pump. If he taps into the existing pipe before the trap, he doesn't need to penetrate the house.
    – Huesmann
    Commented Sep 1, 2023 at 12:59

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.