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We bought a newer home. The GFCI has on and off buttons. I press the on button and it lights up yellow. Is this supposed to stay on green? The dishwasher is wired directly to the breaker box. Does it need a 15 amp by itself?

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    Pics? Most GFCI outlets I've seen have a TEST button and a RESET button (could be black and red, respectively, or both body color). Is it an outlet, or a dead front GFCI?
    – Huesmann
    Jul 26, 2023 at 13:09
  • Please post a photo and some identification Jul 26, 2023 at 13:28
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    You're asking two distinct questions here--one about outlet operation and one about your circuit. Please see How to Ask and take the tour, then revise to ask just one.
    – isherwood
    Jul 26, 2023 at 13:52
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    GFCIs don't have standard colors or behaviors for their indicator lights. Lighting up yellow could be perfectly normal behavior and telling you nothing is wrong. You'll need to find the make & model of your GFCI and Google its instructions to know what it means.
    – brhans
    Jul 26, 2023 at 14:27

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You would need to check with the instructions that come with the GFCI to determine what the light means.

I don't recall a specific requirement for a dedicated circuit for a dishwasher, but a couple of factors basically result in requiring it.

The instructions that come with the dishwasher must be followed to satisfy Listing lab (like UL, ETL, or CSA), and NEC requires complying with Listing, so if the instructions require a dedicated circuit then you must.

So then the question is what else do you want to feed? There is some question about if inside the cabinet is a wall receptacle that falls under kitchen "Small Appliance Branch Circuit" requirements. If it does then the only way a 15A circuit is legal is if it is dedicated.

If not a "wall" outlet that falls under SABC rules and you want to share with an in the cabinet receptacle or lights then the "fixed in place" appliance rules that limit the appliances to 50% of the shared circuit capacity, so your dishwasher and any other fixed in place appliances on that circuit would have to total 7.5A or less. Not likely.

So maybe a small hard wired appliance like an unlit range hood fan might fit within the circuit capacity, but that is about all.

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