0

we are new houseowners, and the previous owners left a TV we didn't want so we asked them to remove it and they left this big hole in the wall in the process. We've been looking for a contractor that would patch it up, but nobody will even come up to get a quote because the job is "too small". We figured we might as well see how big of a project it would be to patch it up ourselves, so I have a couple questions there: what would we look up to find some information on how to fix this? The hole is around 4 by 6 inches, is that something we should be good fixing ourselves? What kind of tools/materials would we need to patch it? I can provide more pictures/details if need be, any help is much appreciated!

hole

6

1 Answer 1

2

Assuming you aren't going to be repainting the whole wall, the hardest and most expensive part will be matching the paint colour.

Watch a few YouTube videos about patching drywall.

Meanwhile, in a nutshell, here's what you'll do.

For the hole itself, buy:

  • Non-shrinking spackling.
  • A small drywall spatula.
  • A drywall sanding pad.

Then:

  • Scrape away all the loose paint, plaster, and resulting dust.
    (If you can also peel off a large piece of the existing paint, that will help immensely when matching the colour.)
  • Jam a small piece of wood or cardboard or wadded up drywall tape into each hole, ensuring it is recessed from the surface. It doesn't have to fill the hole; it's to prevent the spackling from falling through.
  • Push spackling into the holes.
  • Spread spackling smoothly over the area, slightly overlapping the good painted area.
  • Wait at least as long as suggested on the spackling package for it to dry.
  • Use the sanding pad to remove the excess spackling, leaving a smooth and even surface.
  • Unless you are even more experienced at this than I am, it won't be even, so repeat the spackling and sanding until it is good enough (it will never be perfect).

You can probably get away without priming for such a small area, but if you have some primer, use it.

Then paint it.
You might get a very close color match, but it will almost certainly still be a visible patch to a certain extent.

You'll be surprised how soon you'll learn not to notice it though. Hanging a picture or other decoration over or near it isn't a bad idea either.

As new homeowners, you'll likely be patching and painting other rooms, if not now then in a couple of years. Your skills will improve with practice. Just don't expect a professional appearance the first few hundred times.

2
  • Primer is good insurance against paint flashing. Jul 13, 2023 at 3:12
  • Yeah, your biggest issues will be matching the paint color, sheen, and texture.
    – Huesmann
    Jul 13, 2023 at 13:14

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.