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I'm installing two new outlets in two metal junction boxes in a metal enclosure that houses a bunch of networking gear.

Each outlet is GFCI and supports two whites (neutrals), two blacks (live), & a green screw for the ground. I know I only need one technically but I can't return one of them.

Each junction box has two green screws for a ground wire and the metal enclosure has a screw for a ground wire.

The 14-2 cable in image is not GFCI protected upstream. (electrical panel -> a non GFCI outlet -> 14-2 cable in image). I know that having two GFCIs is overkill but I already bought them & can't return one.

  • Can I connect the line 14-2 cable's black & white wires directly to GFCI outlet 2 in junction box B without using a pig tail? I think I can do it for the black but I believe (but am not sure) it might not be the best idea for the neutral because I'm using GFCIs.

  • Do I need to ground both junction boxes and the patch panel's ground? I think the answer is I should but what's the best way to do that? Should I use a grounding wire connector nut in each junction box to ground the outlet and the junction box & have one run outside of the junction box for the metal enclosure?

Images of diagram, junction box, back of GFCI, & front of GFCI:

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  • That receptacle looks like a Legrand 5262WSP and does not contain any GFCI features. Commented Jun 20, 2023 at 15:54

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Can I connect the line 14-2 romex's black & white wires directly to GFCI outlet 2

Ground wire(s) coming into a metal box must ground directly to the metal box. That's a Code requirement.

This receptacle has the necessary kit to automatically pick up ground from its mounting screws. There is no need to run a ground wire to this receptacle. It is labeled "Spec Grade" and I expect it is stamped "Self-Grounding" somewhere. See 250.146(B). Even if it didn't have that mark, if there was hard flush metal on metal contact with the metal box, that is sufficient. See 250.146(A).

Switches don't even need that. Metal boxes are marvelous :)

Should I use a grounding wire connector nut in each junction box to ground the outlet and the junction box & have one run outside of the junction box for the metal enclosure?

I don't see a need to. One box will have two Romex cables and the other box will have one. The boxes have enough ground screws to take each ground wire to its own screw, and you're finished with grounds yay!

back of GFCI, & front of GFCI

That's not a GFCI. That's a Legrand 5262SP Surge Suppressor. It has no GFCI protection whatsoever. I can see why someone might want surge suppression in an electronics bay, but GFCI it is not.

Try putting a GFCI receptacle in the prior location, but first, pause to understand the "Downline Protection" feature of GFCIs and how the Load terminals are used in that.

Your surge suppressor doesn't have any Load terminals, so don't go off that :)

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  • I don't see the "self-grounding" stamp anywhere. If it doesn't have any load terminals - does this mean I have to use wire nuts for the black and white wires in junction box B? If so, why does the outlet have two entry points for both the black and white wires?
    – Sk5
    Commented Jun 19, 2023 at 15:30
  • Since it has two holes each on the "black" and "white" screws, you can use the device to splice the incoming power line to another device. It doesn't have separate terminals because either: it doesn't provide any downstream protection (in which case you'll need another surge protector at the other location if you want surge protection there) or its surge-protection will protect other devices wired in parallel as long as it is working (surge protectors try to shunt surges to ground, they don't disconnect line/neutral like a GFCI). Check the instructions.
    – nobody
    Commented Jun 19, 2023 at 17:23
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    @sk5 code requires you to install according to instructions and labeling. Read the instructions for how to attach 2 wires to each screw. It's still not a GFCI - you're clear on that, right? I'm starting to worry about you lol, but I assume someone who needs a networking cabinet can figure out GFCIs. Also with two GFCIs you would not use the Load terminals at all - Load is only for protecting other (plain) outlets from that GFCI. Commented Jun 19, 2023 at 17:58
  • >. It's still not a GFCI - you're clear on that, right? Absolutely. After looking at the outlet - it's definitely not one. > I assume someone who needs a networking cabinet can figure out GFCIs. a very reasonable assumption :)
    – Sk5
    Commented Jun 20, 2023 at 22:57

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