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So I have exposed wiring in a light fixture in the closet (see photo. Note: had just removed the nut from the live wires before the photo).

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This wire is passing through and also connects to the ceiling light in the bedroom which is on a switch. Tested that if i disconnect the connections shown in the photo, the bedroom ceiling light no longer works.

The strange part is that each of the live wires here is on different circuit breakers. Maybe this is normal, but seemed odd to me.

My question is - how would I wire a light into this connection? I have a pull chain fixture i’d like to use (see other photo) and I thought i could put both live wires into the fixture terminals, both neutrals, and both grounds as well to pass it through and get this light to function as well as keep the bedroom ceiling light.

enter image description here
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enter image description here
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The problem is I cannot get these solid wires twisted together in a way to keep the connection and connect to the fixture.

Any help here as to how i can wire in this fixture to the setup shown?

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    Highly unlikely that each of the wires is on a different breaker and the light does not work when this is disconnected. I would guess you are using a NCVT and it's getting fooled. Connect the wires, turn on the light, turn off one of the breakers you think is in involved. If the light goes off, turn it back on and turn off the other. If it's really on two breakers, the light will stay on with either turned on. And that's a problem that needs to be found, and fixed. If it turns off with one of the breakers, while the other is on, the breaker that's off is the breaker that feeds it.
    – Ecnerwal
    Commented Jun 11, 2023 at 0:01
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    You use a wire nut to connect a short wire to the live wires. Repeat for the neutral. You usually want one wire per screw. The real problem is the two breakers the live wires are connected to. A picture of the panel showing the the two breakers is needed, plus how you tested the wires to find out there were two breakers.
    – crip659
    Commented Jun 11, 2023 at 0:01
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    @EliChamberlin how was the previous closet light operated? Was it previously a pull chain fixture (that just broke), or was there another switching method?
    – Huesmann
    Commented Jun 11, 2023 at 12:48
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    Switch the other light on. Does the closet light work then? Switch the other light off. Does the closet light work then? And you still have not sorted out the "two breakers" part of this, or reported your findings on it.
    – Ecnerwal
    Commented Jun 11, 2023 at 13:16
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    So the box was just 2 cables with the respective wired nutted together—no fixture, just a cover?
    – Huesmann
    Commented Jun 11, 2023 at 16:13

1 Answer 1

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The Lamp Holder in your photo requires exactly three wires. It is not designed for attaching more than three wires.

The terminal screws are color coded where normally the black wire goes to brass, white wire to silver, and bare wire to green.

All of the terminal screws remain exposed inside the ceiling box after mounting, so care must be taken to guarantee the bare wires can never touch the other screws. For that specific reason, I would never recommend novice installation of such a cheap product.

You might have better luck with a full luminaire and pull chain, where the wires you need are already built in and can be connected to the existing wire nuts.

Back of LED ceiling light with pull chain

For any more specific help, you would need to have an "after" photo showing what you did and why it might have failed to turn on.

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