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I'm plumbing a basement bathroom. Here's the basic layout: sink, toilet, shower. Will the pictured setup pass code? All vents are 1.5in. and will be taken to the wall. The 60° elbow on the shower will be changed for a 45° tomorrow.

enter image description here

Left is a vanity. Middle is toilet. Right is shower. Vanity is wet vented. Toilet vent will connect to vanity vent and run to towards the window. Shower vent will run towards the window then straight up. Do the vent Wyes need to be angled up more?

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  • Which code is applicable to your specific location?
    – Ecnerwal
    Apr 12, 2023 at 2:12
  • IPC Rhode Island Apr 12, 2023 at 2:26
  • what is the one on the left for
    – Traveler
    Apr 12, 2023 at 4:23
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    Left is a vanity. Middle is toilet. Right is shower. Vanity is wet vented. Toilet vent will connect to vanity vent and run to towards the window. Shower vent will run towards the window then straight up. Do the vent wyes need to be angled up more? Apr 12, 2023 at 9:35
  • I don't understand what you mean about the toilet vent connecting to the vanity vent but also going towards the window where the shower vent is. It's hard to see the angle of the shower vent wye in this photo, maybe it needs to be up more.
    – jay613
    Apr 12, 2023 at 14:44

2 Answers 2

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I'm unfamiliar with the IPC code, but I believe it allows for a 'Horizontal Wet Vent' to be used in this situation.

I did a quick read of what I could find online, and I believe that IPC does not restrict the connection order of the fixtures. This is odd to me as where I'm from, one of the big requirements of a wet vent with a toilet is that the toilet must be the last fixture (or connected symmetrically) in the wet vent.

(If someone familiar with IPC could confirm, that would be great).

Therefore, the option on the left would meet the IPC wet vent, and the option on the right would meet the requirement of the toilet being the last or symmetrically connected fixture.

enter image description here

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  • The IPC still has the toilet constraint for vertical wet vents, just not horizontal ones. Note the constraint in IPC 912.1.1 and the absence of a parallel constraint in IPC 912.1. The original arrangement looks okay for wet venting if the pipe sizes and distances check out. Did you propose the alternative to shorten the distance from vent to shower drain?
    – popham
    Nov 8, 2023 at 4:50
  • The "last or symmetrically connected" thing allows for the toilet to be symmetrically connected with something else (including another toilet) at the last-fixture position. The toilet is already sitting by itself at the last fixture position. I don't think that symmetrically connecting the lav and shower accomplishes anything.
    – popham
    Nov 8, 2023 at 4:52
  • To clarify, the toilet being the last fixture in the wet vent means that it does not pass the connection of any other fixture's drain to the wet vent when the toilet drains. The reasoning is that it will have a larger sudden volume and could temporarily choke off the other fixture's vent. This would be more applicable before low-volume flush toilets.
    – pdd
    Nov 8, 2023 at 17:06
  • I propose to eliminate the separate vent for the shower by having the toilet and shower wet-vented through the sink's vent.
    – pdd
    Nov 8, 2023 at 17:06
  • Ah. I forgot that only one fixture can be upstream from the wet vent. Is that why you moved the lav upstream of the shower in the left drawing? So that only the toilet is upstream of the wet vent?
    – popham
    Nov 8, 2023 at 18:02
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You're mixing terms. Your plumbing is arranged for individual venting, not wet venting. In a wet vent, the individual vent of the lavatory would provide venting for both the shower and the lav. For the shower to vent through it, however, the vent include a section of the lav's drain line. This explains the term "wet vent," where the shower's vent is wet with the water draining from the lav.

As long as your vent fittings are rotated up a little above horizontal, your setup looks good.

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