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I recently purchased a used stove that I’ve now noticed has rust spots on it. The stove works great but the rust is an awful eye sore. I was wondering a good way to either paint or somehow remove the rust in a way that it will last.

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  • Not a duplicate, but related, and a possible approach (which may look better than dabbing touch-up paint on) once you get the rust taken care of: diy.stackexchange.com/a/215950/18078
    – Ecnerwal
    Mar 12, 2023 at 21:47

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You'll first want to remove the existing rust. There are many rust removers on the market but I've always used plain old white vinegar. Brush it on the rusted areas, lety it sit for 15 to 20 minutes and then wipe the area with a cloth. you might have to re apply a few times if there's still rust. Once the rust is gone, get some emery paper and sand down the area to really clean the area and smooth out the existing paint where it meets the preiously rusted area. Then get some appliance paint from your home store and paint the area.

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For the door, I'd recommend removing the rusty trim piece before trying to treat it. Usually, lifting up on a partially-open (Caution - a bit heavy) door will remove it, and then a few screws on the inside can be removed. Trying to repair it in-place would be likely to further damage the stove.

That trim can be hand-sanded, or a phosphoric acid rust remover can remove some more rust. Thoroughly rinse the part afterwards, to remove any cleaner or grit remaining. Afterwards, it can be covered with a high-temperature metal-based paint. [Note that links to products are examples only.] Regrettably, the rusted areas would still be rougher than surrounding trim, but alternatives, such as replacing that trim or commercial electroplating, would probably be uneconomical.

As for the spot by the switch, you might use masking tape to protect the good areas, gently sand and/or apply rust remover, clean, then apply high-temp paint, perhaps with a cotton swab, rather than spraying directly.

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Personally, I would use a rust converter. First, scrape or peel back the surrounding paint just enough so you can see bare unrusted metal around the rusted spots. Use a small wire brush to brush away the loose rust—you want to leave a little bit. Apply rust converter to each spot, following manufacturer instructions. Then paint with matching paint. Depending how visible a repair you're OK with you may need to do some followup wetsanding and polishing.

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