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There's a structural pillar made with 2x4s in my middle of my room that I have turned into a light and encased the sides in prime pine. This pillar will be bumped and shoulder-brushed all the time. In this application, is it still not necessary to use construction adhesive (or why not wood glue?) or will it actually be helpful?

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    Construction adhesive would definitely be overkill. Wood glue would be more reasonable, but building trim is normally not glued because you may want to disassemble it later for maintenance and be able to reassemble later.
    – keshlam
    Commented Mar 10, 2023 at 16:40
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    Your question isn't really clear. A wider shot would help. That said, I'd have put most of the finished trim together with wood glue. Why didn't you?
    – isherwood
    Commented Mar 10, 2023 at 16:49
  • @keshlam, nearly all building trim is glued. Exceptions might be inside corner copes and removable pocket door jamb sections.
    – isherwood
    Commented Mar 10, 2023 at 17:26
  • Not that I have seen. Window trim, door trim, baseboards... Maybe Boston carpenters are still traditionalists, but ....
    – keshlam
    Commented Mar 10, 2023 at 17:57
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    Please revise to be more specific about what you're asking. There's debate in the comments you can clear up with a little more effort.
    – isherwood
    Commented Mar 10, 2023 at 19:15

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Note, I answered Wynne's actual original question regarding gluing trim (to the building), not Isherwood's "change the question to suit his answer" edited title.

I can't see:

will be bumped and shoulder-brushed all the time.

As something that would be likely to pull the trim off, so I don't see how glue is going to "help" in any way.

If you're abnormally worried about it falling apart, use trim-head screws rather than finish nails. Yet finish nails work fine to hold trim on in millions of buildings, so I'm not clear what you're worried about. It tends to stay put just fine until someone takes a pry-bar to it to remove it, and that someone will curse you for using glue, especially if they happen to be you, but a few years from now.

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  • That meshes with my preferences. My handmade window trim is affixed with trim-head screws; most of the rest of the trim in the house is nails or occasionally screws. I don't see any advantage, in something which may need to be maintained and isn't carrying load, to applying glue. But this may be a matter of regional practices.
    – keshlam
    Commented Mar 10, 2023 at 18:00
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Nearly all trim and cabinetry in a modern home is glued. This is standard and expected, in my opinion. You've essentially built a cabinet faceframe here, and it should've been glued in addition to the dowels, pocket screws, or whatever fasteners you've used. Doing so would provide much support to each component of the frame and prevented anything from being knocked loose by casual contact.

This is my $.02 as a professional carpenter and casual woodworker.

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    Glue cabinetry together, yes. The panel itself, sure. The stops holding the transparent material, maybe if it's shatterproof and will never get scratched enough to replace. Attaching to the building... That wants to be reversable.
    – keshlam
    Commented Mar 10, 2023 at 18:04
  • I can see gluing miter joints to help keep them from separating, but not gluing the trim itself to the x that it's trimming out.
    – FreeMan
    Commented Mar 10, 2023 at 18:27
  • The question is rather vague about what it's referring to, but I see no indication that it refers to gluing the frame assembly to the post.
    – isherwood
    Commented Mar 10, 2023 at 19:11
  • Agreed, the original question is far too vague. The variations in answers & comments proves that.
    – FreeMan
    Commented Mar 10, 2023 at 19:36

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