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The package says these nuts can handle the size range 2-18 to 2-14. Is a single 14AWG in that range?

This is going to be a temporary cap off for several months until house is painted and new pergola built. The wires feed porch lights.

front of bag of nuts

back of bag of nuts

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    The CE multipacks will include little blue ones, which twist nice and tight on a single 14awg. Feb 8, 2023 at 2:24

3 Answers 3

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Minimum is two #18 AWG which would be .00256 sq.in. One #14 AWG is .00323 sq. in. and is less than two #14 AWG so you'll be fine using those wire nuts.

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    This may be the most significant-digit complete answer I've seen here! ;)
    – FreeMan
    Feb 8, 2023 at 12:25
  • This doesn't take into account the insulator. I find that a nut on a single conductor holds WAY better if you don't strip the wire. (obviously only applies to single conductors:-))
    – Jeffrey
    Feb 8, 2023 at 17:49
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1 #14 should be just fine. Worst case, twist it as tightly as you can and then add a piece of electrical tape to hold it on.

In general, I think wire nuts don't list 1 of anything because they are officially called wire connectors. If you have only one, you are not connecting anything together. But they can certainly work well with one wire as a protector, particularly if that wire is not at the low end of the range for that particular wire nut - e.g., I would not use this for a single #18.

See also: "The sound of one hand clapping"

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Max is 2-14. 1-14 is less.

It might do two 14 gauge wires, but really most people would suggest a larger size nut if at the max.

One 14 gauge will be at the sweet spot for those nuts.

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    The diameter may be in range, but you really have to pay attention to the stripped wire length when putting a wire nut on only one wire. When you have multiple conductors twisting together into a spiral, they end up taking less linear length than their stripped length. That doesn't happen with a single conductor.
    – nobody
    Feb 8, 2023 at 0:45

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