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I had a question in regard to a half hot outlet in a bedroom. I am redoing the room and wanted to eliminate the half hot outlet since I am adding recessed lighting.

I have power (2-wire) coming in to a two gang box, the black is then jumped to a fan switch, and then jumped to a the half hot switch with 3 wire (red) coming off of the bottom terminal of switch up to the attic and down to the outlet. Pic attached.

I eliminated the 3 wire from the box and was left with no power to the last outlet in a (4) outlet room.

Is it common that the only source of power that (1) outlet was getting was from that half hot switch?

There is another 2 wire in the box that I assumed would have been power from the other outlets in the room, but that is not the case. It is a dead line. My other guess is it is feeding the outlet directly behind it in another room that is dead also (pic attached). This outlet has (2) 2 wires going into it.

Everything else in the house works except for these two outlets.

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    It is common that an outlet or two can be switched and is often done as a half hot duplex. It is so you can have one device switched and other stuff always hot. Commented Dec 29, 2022 at 3:11
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    A half switch hot outlet must have two sources for power for each outlet. The power might power half and also the switch and come back to the second half. The orange wago has power(black wire) coming in, power to something else(switch), and power to the outlet, with power coming back for second half.
    – crip659
    Commented Dec 29, 2022 at 4:18
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    Sorry for the confusion. I edited the pictures above for a better understanding. The half hot outlet I removed the 3 wire (red) completely. I was left with (1) 2 wire in the outlet box that is dead. The other pic with the wago's is the outlet in a room directly behind it. This one is also dead. And I do not think it is powering anything else because everything else in the house works. I am thinking those two outlets were just run together. But I have to get it power again from the original switch box I assume.
    – USMCGRUNT
    Commented Dec 29, 2022 at 4:59
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    "I figured out the opposite room outlet. It is tied into the half hot outlet then feeds a separate attic light on a chain pull. Unreal…haha. As far as the half hot outlet, that was it…the main power for it came from that switch box. So I just ran a new wire to it." - You could have just replaced the outlet, tab intact, onto the incoming power that isn't switched, which is now capable of branching power off of, and put a blank plate where the switch was, capping w/e is now defunct. But if a new wire gets it a little more intuitively separate, then that was the good plan.
    – Mazura
    Commented Jan 28, 2023 at 18:10

2 Answers 2

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Check all of your wire connections. The wires in the outlets and switches are in "backstabs" that are notorious for poor connections. Also check all the wire connected with wire nuts and wagos.

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    I absolutely got rid of the backstabs. That was the before picture when I first opened the outlet. The 3 wire (red) isn’t even in there anymore. Once I pulled that 3 wire out of there, it killed the remaining 2 wire left in the box and also killed the outlet in the opposite room (pic above). Everything worked fine until I pulled that 3 wire out of there. That’s why it was hard to believe that the sole source of power for that outlet was the 3 wire coming from the switch box.
    – USMCGRUNT
    Commented Dec 29, 2022 at 6:21
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    I figured out the opposite room outlet. It is tied into the half hot outlet then feeds a separate attic light on a chain pull. Unreal…haha. As far as the half hot outlet, that was it…the main power for it came from that switch box. So I just ran a new wire to it. I couldn’t believe the only power to that one outlet was a hot wire from the switch which is on a completely separate circuit. Learned something new…
    – USMCGRUNT
    Commented Dec 29, 2022 at 16:44
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    Glad you found the issue. Thanks for letting us know.
    – RMDman
    Commented Dec 29, 2022 at 23:00
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Just for reference: The half-switched outlet setup was most often used in rooms without an overhead or wall light fixture. It permits plugging in a table or floor lamp and controlling that from the room switch, while also supporting an unswitched device such as an alarm clock. Of course to do this it needs both switched and unswitched power coming in. In the US, red is usually secondary hot, in this case presumably switched hot.

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